From Russia, With Love The sad saga of an 8-year-old boy sent back to Russia by an American woman who adopted him resonates among adoptive parents. Adopted children are sometimes haunted by the notion that no matter how good they are, they too could be abandoned.
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From Russia, With Love

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From Russia, With Love

From Russia, With Love

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SCOTT SIMON, Host:

The 3,000 American families now in some stage of adopting Russian children are a small number to ease a great need that I hope will not be stinted by a single, outrageous case. Putting children who need love and care into families who crave a child's love is one of the great unfinished endeavors of the world.

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