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DAVID GREENE, host:

And as we head into a holiday weekend, we're starting to obsess about another summer food. We're setting out to build the perfect hot dog - if that's even possible.

Mr. BARRY NEMEROW (Co-owner, Weiner's Circle): Is it possible? It's possible in Chicago.

GREENE: Barry Nemerow is the co-owner of a joint called Wiener's Circle in Chicago, and he says for the perfect hot dog, start with a wiener that's built like a sausage, with the natural casing made of lamb or pork.

Mr. NEMEROW: So when you bite into it, it kind of snaps and gives you, you know, a big burst of flavor, the seasonings and everything in there, and it just adds a little more to the hot dog.

GREENE: And how best to cook it? Well, maybe we should start with how not to cook it.

Ms. GRACE KEROS (Owner, The American Coney Island): Do not ever boil it. Always grill it.

GREENE: Grace Keros, owner of The American Coney Island in Detroit. I think it's safe to say this is a woman who is passionate about hot dogs.

Ms. KEROS: If you don't want to turn on a grill, put it in the broiler oven. Put it on a pancake griddle. Put it in a toaster oven. But please do not boil your natural-casing hot dog, because it's going to be mushy and rubbery.

GREENE: And what about avoiding that mushy hot dog bun? Well, throw that on the grill, too, and butter if first. That's the advice from Brian Shebairo of Crif Dogs in New York City.

Mr. BRIAN SHEBAIRO (Crif Dogs): Mom's grilled-cheese sandwich when you were a kid was always made in a frying pan with butter, and was always delicious. Anything with butter on it is great.

GREENE: Shebairo also recommends a German-style mustard, with just a dash of horseradish. For advice on another critical condiment, we called up Jim Rivers of Ole Time Hot Dogs in Cary, North Carolina.

Mr. JIM RIVERS (Ole Time Hot Dogs): The white onions last longer, and they're a much crisper onion than a yellow onion. I have people come that want the extra onions, because they're so crisp.

GREENE: And I'm so sorry, we would love to delve into some of the complexities about chili and relish and sauerkraut, but we sadly don't have the time. We're going for simple perfection here, although we should mention that all of our cooks begged us: Please, do not put ketchup on a hot dog. Just don't. You can find our recipe at npr.org. But first things first. Let's test it out.

(Soundbite of bat hitting ball and cheers)

GREENE: After going out and buying these hotdogs with natural casing, the buns, the horseradish mustard, a few sweet, white onions, we heated up a little charcoal grill and then presented our version of the perfect hot dog to the most discerning crowd we could find: at a little league ballpark.

(Soundbite of cheers)

GREENE: So this is my tray of hot dogs. Yeah, take it. Dive in. Yeah. This is what we were hoping for. Do you like them?

Unidentified Child #1: Yeah.

GREENE: What do you think?

Unidentified Child #2: They're good.

Unidentified Child #3: Yeah.

JAKE: I think this should go into the snack bar.

GREENE: Don't tell the snack bar. I mean, they've got good dogs, too. What's your name?

JAKE: Jake.

GREENE: So is this I want to ask you about the dog here. Do you know what that's called?

JAKE: No.

GREENE: A natural casing.

JAKE: What's a natural casing?

GREENE: That was my question. It's like this natural meat that kind of wraps around the dog. Take a bite of this one. You feel that snap?

JAKE: Yeah.

GREENE: Yeah, we were told that that's what makes a good dog. You seem to agree with that.

(Soundbite of chatter)

GREENE: All right, it's my turn. I'm taking another bite of this. Oh, these kids are right. That's a really good dog. I guess if you're looking for a nice grilling recipe this weekend, nice hot dog recipe, maybe you found it here. Have a great Memorial Day weekend. That is good, that is good.

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