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After Branch Kills Baby, New Yorkers Look Skyward

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After Branch Kills Baby, New Yorkers Look Skyward

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After Branch Kills Baby, New Yorkers Look Skyward

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: Here's New York's mayor, Michael Bloomberg.

: This is, I think - may just have been an act of God.

: NPR's Margot Adler is one of many New Yorkers who walk by that tree almost every day.

MARGOT ADLER: I go by that tree every day as I walk to work. Taking that route again this morning, I asked people what they were thinking as they walked by. Most were tourists who hadn't heard about it. But New Yorkers were eager to comment.

: My whole thing is keep everything green. But, listen, if it's going to kill people, cut it down.

: It definitely makes you more conscious of your surroundings, and what's happening and going on.

: I think it is nature. It's not a freak of nature. It's just the way things go. I feel sorry for the family.

U: All these branches are dead. Take a look. It could've been any one of us.

ADLER: Margot Adler, NPR News, New York.

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