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(Soundbite of music)

MICHEL MARTIN, host:

On the second Saturday of every month, you can hear - but more importantly, dance to - up tempo soul and funk infused music better known as deep house. For the uninitiated, like me, you can identify the house genre by the prominent kick drum that helps you feel every beat in the music.

A diverse group of house music fans convenes at the Paradox Club in Baltimore to dance, or as they call it, jack their body. Tucked away under railroad tracks, the Paradox hosts legendary underground house music DJs who spin for a crowd that mostly grew in the mid-80's when house music first became popular. Most dancers or jackers begin arriving around 2 a.m. and they jack until sunrise.

Producers Sami Yenigun and Monika Evstatieva visited the club one hot summer night.

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VANESSA: My name is Vanessa and I've been clubbing to house music since I was 16 years old. I'm 43. Thank you very much. And I just love the music. It's just my inspiration. It just lifts my spirit and I work hard. So when I come out and relax this is what I do.

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VANESSA: I like this music because it brings diversity. You know, we're about, everybody just coming together like a melting pot and just embracing each other and just loving each other. And then we have so many people that's here, been clubbing here for years.

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Unidentified Woman: (Singing) Close your eyes and let your head roll(ph) down. Your feet up off the ground.

Mr. CHRIS BURNS (DJ and club promoter): My name is Chris Burns. I'm a DJ, producer and promoter from Washington, D.C., and I deal in the business of house music. Every DJ has a different mission, is going to have a different responsibility. But my personal goal is to inflect my appreciation and respect for the history and sound of older house music into newer technology, into newer production techniques, so that it's a fusion of both. And I think that this going to come around with a lot of other producers, as youve seen the resurgence of popular you know, Robin S "Show me Love."

(Soundbite of song, "Show me Love")

ROBIN S (Singer): (Singing) You've got to show me love. Heartbreak and promises.

Mr. BURNS: Ce Ce Penitston, "Finally" and all the other, you know, popular tracks of the early 90's of, you know, of that era.

(Soundbite of song, "Show me Love")

ROBIN S: (Singing) Im tired of giving my love and getting nowhere, nowhere.

Mr. BURNS: The Paradox is a real throwback club that was built I think in 1990 and it's pretty much stayed unchanged except with a few architectural modifications. It has the same original analog sound system, the same as you would find in clubs built in that era. And with technology changing to a more digital format, with deejaying and sound technology, sounds systems aren't built like that anymore. And to be honest, I think this Paradox is very special because it has the best sound system on the East Coast that I've heard of.

(Soundbite of song, "Show me Love")

ROBIN S (Singer): (Singing) So, baby if you want me. Youve got to show me love.

Mr. BURNS: A lot of different people go the Deep Sugar parties at the Paradox. The Deep Sugar really has preserved the house music culture in Baltimore that is really rich and still has a great influence on dance music today.

The demographic predominately is an older, middle-aged black crowd that, you know, has continued to dance and has continued to support house music, especially in Baltimore.

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Ms. SONIA HELLYER: My name is Sonia Hellyer. I've been coming for how many years? Been at least probably 14 years, Ill say. And I just love house music. House music is something I relax to. I dance. It's a form of release, a form of exercise for me and I enjoy the atmosphere, as well.

I have a daughter who is nine and we clean the house to house music. And it's funny because she'll say mom, could we listen to your music? The music moves you. And it just makes you dance. It makes you go. It picks you up. You know, if youre having a bad day, you listen to it because it's also infused with gospel music too. And I can go to church so that like, I'll be out of this world listening to gospel music house. So its just uplifting and (unintelligible).

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MARTIN: Now, our sources tell us that the next Deep Sugar party will be hosted this Saturday night in Baltimore. If you want to find out more about deep house, just go to the program page at npr.org and select TELL ME MORE.

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MARTIN: And that's our program for today. Im Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News.

Lets talk more tomorrow.

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