Social Web

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

One day not long ago, Greg Storm DiCostanzo was listening to his local public radio station to coverage of the WikiLeaks story.

Now, when we at ALL THINGS CONSIDERED first heard about the latest round of documents released by WikiLeaks, we thought about the national security implications and about what sort of story these documents tell about the war in Afghanistan.

Well, not DiCostanzo. Every time he heard about WikiLeaks, he thought about WookieeLeaks.

(Soundbite of Chewbacca yell)

NORRIS: That's right, as in Chewbacca from the "Star Wars" movies. Greg DiCostanzo joins me now to explain to our listeners what exactly is a WookieeLeak. So Greg, or I guess I should call you Storm.

Mr. GREG DiCOSTANZO: Yes, please.

NORRIS: Please tell us. What's the answer to that question? What exactly is a WookieeLeak?

Mr. DiCOSTANZO: A WookieeLeak is a Twitter hash-tag game, and a hash tag is something where you can place a hash mark, a number symbol, in front of a word like, say, WookieeLeaks, to create a searchable codeword that anyone interested in that subject can very quickly look up.

So if you have this codeword, you can create games, usually revolving around puns. It seemed to me like it would make a terrific Twitter game to come up with these ideas about, okay, what if instead of from the war in Afghanistan, there were leaks coming out of the "Star Wars" universe. And so I devised this first tweet: Testimony in some of the papers indicate that Chewbacca used mind-altering drugs while on Endor.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Mr. DiCOSTANZO: Salacious.

(Soundbite of laughter)

NORRIS: Can you do me a favor? Can you share with me some of your favorite posts, just read through a few of them?

Mr. DiCOSTANZO: Sure. From Turkshead(ph): Insurgents targeted by Imperial stormtroopers revealed to be cute, fuzzy Ewoks.

From DowDig(ph): Protocol droid fluent in six million languages discharged for violating don't ask, don't tell.

NORRIS: What is it about "Star Wars" that inspires such boy, you could say geekiness, or perhaps you could say passion.

Mr. DiCOSTANZO: I think there were so many people who grew up with it, as I did. I was seven or eight years old when I first saw it. And I think it's one of the those rare shared experiences anymore that cuts across so many different types of people. And the characters are terrific.

NORRIS: Storm, thanks so much for coming in.

Mr. DiCOSTANZO: Thank you for having me.

NORRIS: That's Greg Storm DiCostanzo. He created Wookieeleaks. He is also half of the comedy duo Paul and Storm.

(Soundbite of song, "Star Wars Theme")

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

And one final note. Today we say goodbye to a true Jedi master, Chelsea Jones.

NORRIS: She's been a key part of our team of ace bookers, working the phones, lining up the guests you hear on the program, including countless lawmakers, artists and experts on everything from medicine to message decoding to the official World Cup ball.

SIEGEL: However impossible the assignment, Chelsea got the job done with grace and with good humor, qualities she'll take with her to law school this fall.

NORRIS: Chelsea, we are going to miss you. May the force be with you.

(Soundbite of song, "Star Wars Theme")

SIEGEL: It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Copyright © 2010 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

NPR thanks our sponsors

Become an NPR sponsor

Support comes from