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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Of course, one sure-fire way to make eggs inedible is to leave them in the trunk of your car. A while back, we asked, via Facebook and Twitter, what's in your trunk?

Ms. AMY BUTLER: If you had asked me about seven years ago, there would have been three dozen eggs that I had forgotten for several months were in there.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Well, at least Amy Butler of Delaware didn't have to worry about salmonella. Here's what a few more of you have lurking in your trunks.

Ms. ANN WEBBER: Okay. Baby powder. If you ever get ants in your car, they won't cross the baby powder.

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Ms. REBECCA BRADSHAW: A baby swing, two clothe diapers, a couple of soil wipes for the diapers. You can see that the stay-at-home mom thing has taken over my life.

Ms. MARY FARKAS: I have an old Sesame Street dollhouse that I can't bear to throw away. It's kind of like my secret.

Mr. ALAN HINOSTROZA: Four fishing polls.

Ms. CLARA SHULER: Four umbrellas.

Mr. HINOSTROZA: On my commute to and from work, I pass four fisheries. If I've got a few moments and some gumption, which I often do, I'll stop and hit one of them.

Ms. CATHY COZAD: We carry those umbrellas in case of an emergency, and also if people need them at church.

Mr. TOBY ERICKSON: Alternator, a starter, spark plug wires, jack. Yes, I could use a cell phone and call a tow truck, but come on. That takes all the fun out of it.

Mr. GUY LEVALLEY: No jack. I worked at an auto wrecking yard for seven years, and I've had enough grease and grime on me that I've got AAA. If I get a flat tire, I'm going to have somebody else change it.

Unidentified Man: One very large plastic bag for my friend who's going to physical therapy. She sits on them and rotates when she gets in.

Ms. DIANE EVANS: I have a wheelchair in my trunk because my husband is disabled, two shopping bags, some kind of an interesting screwdriver, and there's Off, which is really weird, because I don't use it and I don't know who put it in here. And there are some dirty dishes. It's organized chaos.

MONTAGNE: That was Ann Webber, Rebecca Bradshaw and Mary Farkas from California, joined by Clara Shuler from South Carolina, Cathy Cozad from Tennessee, Alan Hinostroza from Utah, Diane Evans from Pennsylvania, Toby Erickson from Michigan and Guy LeValley from Maryland.

INSKEEP: You can become a fan of MORNING EDITION on Facebook. You can also follow us on Twitter @MORNINGEDITION or @nprinskeep.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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