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Memos To The President

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Memos To The President

Opinion

Memos To The President

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MICHELE NORRIS, host:

With the midterms behind him, President Obama is off to Asia. As he and his team huddle to map out a new strategy for a new Congress, we asked for some presidential advice. Today and next week we'll share some memos to the president from inside and beyond the proverbial beltway.

We start with Dee Dee Myers, former White House press secretary for President Bill Clinton.

Ms. DEE DEE MYERS (Former White House Press Secretary, Clinton Administration): Dear Mr. President, I worked for President Clinton when Democrats lost both houses of Congress. Let's just say, I feel your pain.

To rebuild support, you need to reconnect your past to the American people's future. Your mom and your grandparents sometimes struggle, but they taught you about hard work, discipline and sacrifice. If you connect your story to your agenda, your life to your aspirations for every child, people will listen. Godspeed, Mr. President. Sincerely, Dee Dee Myers.

NORRIS: Next, we hear from Matthew Continetti, a conservative journalist.

Mr. MATTHEW CONTINETTI (Journalist): Mr. President, more than anything, the elections of 2010 are about the Great Recession and your administration's response to it. The results show that the public viscerally disagrees with your economic program. So why stick with it? Start by firing Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner and exceeding to Republican demands that current tax rates be extended for two years.

When the electorate repudiated George W. Bush's Iraq policy in 2006, President Bush fired Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld and adopted the surge strategy. You should follow your predecessor's example. Geithner must go. Your friend on the right, Matthew Continetti.

NORRIS: And our last memo to the president comes from comedian Maz Jobrani.

Mr. MAZ JOBRANI (Comedian): Dear Mr. President, as kids we're nagged by your moms: Eat your vegetables, Barack. Then we go to school and it's the teachers. Then we become president and it's the whole damn world. If you don't fix the economy, you can't have any pudding. How can you have any pudding if you don't fix the economy? Well, some of us still have faith in you. Go ahead, have the pudding. We know you'll fix the economy. Oh, and don't forget to clean up the mess in the Middle East and the environment before you go to bed. Your friend, Maz Jobrani.

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