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Report Details Black Male Achievement Gap

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Report Details Black Male Achievement Gap

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Report Details Black Male Achievement Gap

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ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

NPR's Larry Abramson has that story.

LARRY ABRAMSON: As head of the Council of the Great City Schools, Mike Casserly has seen lots of depressing numbers about achievement for minority students. But performance for black males is shockingly low.

MICHAEL CASSERLY: African-American male students who were neither disabled nor poor were doing no better than white male students who were disabled and or poor.

ABRAMSON: The Council of the Great City Schools hopes these numbers will lead to a White House conference focusing on achievement for black males. But many other studies have drawn attention to this problem with few results.

ABRAMSON: Most black male students go to lousy schools.

MICHAEL HOLZMAN: If we look at schools that are predominately black, and we look at the achievement of white kids who are in those schools, we find that the white kids don't do well either.

ABRAMSON: Some black leaders, however, feel the problem goes beyond funding. Michael Wotorson, of the Campaign for High School Equity, says black students enter kindergarten less prepared. And that means black home life plays some role.

MICHAEL WOTORSON: Until we address our own culpability, we're going to be making very, very slow progress.

ABRAMSON: Larry Abramson, NPR News, Washington.

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