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Baseball's Courtesy Gap: Post-Game Handshakes

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Baseball's Courtesy Gap: Post-Game Handshakes

Baseball's Courtesy Gap: Post-Game Handshakes

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Our sports commentator Frank Deford recently got a letter - not an email, a real letter with a stamp in an envelope - from a friend wondering about the finer points of being a good sport.

FRANK DEFORD: Even those whom the Duchess called ruffians on ice may pound each other all during the season, but when a hockey playoff series is over and one team is eliminated, the players on both teams - including the goons - skate slowly past each other and shake hands.

INSKEEP: I find that really quite lovely, Frank. Even brutes can be taught to be civilized upon occasion.

C: I wish the losers would at least tip their hats to their conquerors, the Duchess concluded. There is no reason why baseball players can't be gentlemen, like others of the sporting persuasion.

INSKEEP: Frank Deford, of the commenting persuasion, joins us each Wednesday from member station WSHU in Fairfield, Connecticut.

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