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UConn Women's Team Rises To A Watershed Moment

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UConn Women's Team Rises To A Watershed Moment

UConn Women's Team Rises To A Watershed Moment

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Commentator Frank Deford says hockey is not the only women's team sport that has trouble attracting fans.

FRANK DEFORD: In a crowded world of images, you need the extreme to upset the accepted. You need a phenomenon to change the everyday.

INSKEEP: Many of you are commenting on women's sports at our Facebook page.

DON GONYEA, Host:

Betsy Padilla blames the media for letting women's sports be overshadowed. She says women's sports media coverage is soft, without the exciting music and detailed analysis of men's sports.

INSKEEP: Jeffrey Gleit(ph) writes that Connecticut's women's basketball ream is already a media favorite, with every game seen live on the local public TV station.

GONYEA: Victoria Smith Quinn writes that she's a college basketball purist. At a time when the men's game is all about flash and shoes, she says the women's game represents traditional skill and strategy.

INSKEEP: Conversations like this one begin every morning at your Public Radio station, and you can follow them throughout the day.

GONYEA: It's Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Don Gonyea.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep

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