Critics Condemn Violent Video Game Set In Juarez A soon-to-be-released video game — Call of Juarez: The Cartel — that glorifies murder and mayhem in the violence-wracked city of Juarez, Mexico, is sparking an outcry. Critics on the border say it's in bad taste given the thousands of people killed in the city's drug wars over the past few years.
NPR logo

Critics Condemn Violent Video Game Set In Juarez

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133966367/133986447" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Critics Condemn Violent Video Game Set In Juarez

Critics Condemn Violent Video Game Set In Juarez

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133966367/133986447" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

As NPR's John Burnett reports, critics on the border are already condemning the game.

JOHN BURNETT: A screen-shot of the game pictures an outlaw in a flak jacket and cowboy hat, gripping a shotgun, next to the words: Welcome to the new Wild West. Take justice in your own hands - on a bloody road trip from Los Angeles to Juarez. The industrial border city across from El Paso has become Mexico's murder capital, and by some estimates, the homicide capital of the world. Last year, there were an average of eight murders a day. The majority were victims of a savage turf war between two rival drug cartels. In a particularly violent 72-hour period, from last Thursday to Saturday, 53 more people were gunned down. They included two police officers and a state investigator.

HOWARD CAMPBELL: In Juarez, there's been a real tremendous outcry against this video because people see it as really the ultimate in dehumanization of the people of Juarez.

BURNETT: Howard Campbell is an anthropology professor at the University of Texas at El Paso who closely follows the drug war across the river in Mexico.

CAMPBELL: More than 8,000 people have been killed in the last four years in Juarez and it's not something to joke about. Their problems are so severe and then, for people to sort of mock them and make light of them, is very, very insulting.

BURNETT: John Burnett, NPR News.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.