Be Sparing With The 'Broad Stripes And Bright Stars' Sponsoring a NASCAR vehicle might actually get young people interested in joining the Army, says Frank Deford. However, singing the national anthem and spending money to have military jets fly over a sports stadium probably won't. So there's no need to continually give proof at games that our flag is still there.
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Be Sparing With The 'Broad Stripes And Bright Stars'

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Be Sparing With The 'Broad Stripes And Bright Stars'

Be Sparing With The 'Broad Stripes And Bright Stars'

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Our commentator Frank Deford has been watching the way this spending has become part of the political debate.

FRANK DEFORD: Even sports has gotten into the budget-cutting, when a House amendment was offered the other day that would prevent the Army from spending $7 million to sponsor NASCAR race car Number 39. But even in a slash-and-burn atmosphere, the amendment was soundly beaten. There are a lot of congressmen prepared to do away with a lot of good old-fashioned, all-American stuff, but keep your hands off my NASCAR.

INSKEEP: And sure, if Chevrolet Number 39 works as a recruiting commercial, let the taxpayers ante up for it. But, hey, Congress, how about we cut the funding for fighter jets flying over stadiums?

INSKEEP: I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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