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Troops, Vets Find Vindication On The Supreme Court

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Troops, Vets Find Vindication On The Supreme Court

Law

Troops, Vets Find Vindication On The Supreme Court

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MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

And as NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg reports, one case involved employment discrimination; the other, the rights of veterans to appeal a denial of benefits.

NINA TOTENBERG: But in 2000, a new supervisor started scheduling him for times she knew he was due to be at Reserve training. Then in 2004, he was notified that he would be called back to active duty.

VINCENT STAUB: My boss knew what was coming, and within days, that's when, you know, the ball went into motion of the false allegations.

TOTENBERG: Perhaps more importantly, many large employers in recent years have sought to protect themselves from discrimination suits by vesting final decision-making authority in HR departments, a sort of safe harbor, says Tom Goldstein, who teaches Supreme Court advocacy at Stanford and Harvard law schools.

TOM GOLDSTEIN: Those HR departments wouldn't have any discriminatory motive, and the employers thought that would protect them from lawsuits, and the Supreme Court today said no: If a supervisor acts with a discriminatory motive, that's your supervisor, and you're going to be held responsible.

TOTENBERG: Nina Totenberg, NPR News, Washington.

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