Yearning For Change, Haitians Head To The Polls The return of exiled former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide added a new layer of complexity to Sunday's presidential election. Though he remains wildly popular with Haiti's poor, many say that with all the country has struggled through recently, they're ready for something new.
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Yearning For Change, Haitians Head To The Polls

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Yearning For Change, Haitians Head To The Polls

Yearning For Change, Haitians Head To The Polls

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LIANE HANSEN, Host:

Welcome to the program.

DIRK VANDEWALLE: Good morning.

HANSEN: You wrote that the no-fly zone introduces more problems than it solves in the immediate future. What do you mean? Why?

VANDEWALLE: Because of what we know, because of what Gadhafi has already threatened that he could use all kinds of actions in the Mediterranean against European interests, and so on, it seems to me that that is not a solution that is really a satisfactory in the long run to the international community.

HANSEN: But the U.S. military has been stressing that the aims of the strikes in Libya are limited.

VANDEWALLE: And if that's indeed what we are satisfied with, then the action could be over relatively quickly; as President Obama said, in days and not weeks. But again, it doesn't solve the underlying problem, I think, of what really should happen with Gadhafi. And if potentially divided Libya is really in the interest of the international community.

HANSEN: Who actually is being helped by this no-fly zone? I mean, do you have a sense of who these rebels are?

VANDEWALLE: And that opens up whole can of the difficulties in terms of who should represent Libya, and whether or not it's really in the interest of the international community to see a strong eastern province emerge, perhaps with weapons, as delivered by the international community and so on knowing that down the road somehow Tripoli will have get folded back into a united Libya.

HANSEN: What does this mean for Gadhafi?

VANDEWALLE: But I think in the end, with everything against him now, and really with his support now very closely concentrated in Tripoli and Tripoli alone, it seems to me that in the long run there really is no way out for Gadhafi. I truly think that this is the beginning of the end. But again, when that end will come precisely I think is still undetermined.

HANSEN: Dirk Vanderwalle is an associate professor of Government at Dartmouth College. He's also the author of "A History of Modern Libya." Thank you.

VANDEWALLE: My pleasure.

HANSEN: You're listening to NPR News.

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