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Katie Couric Prepares To Leave The Anchor Desk As The Landscape Shifts

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Katie Couric Prepares To Leave The Anchor Desk As The Landscape Shifts

Katie Couric Prepares To Leave The Anchor Desk As The Landscape Shifts

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MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

Well, NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik joins me now from our studios in New York to talk about all this. And David, Katie Couric has said publicly she's considering a syndicated talk show. What's the state of play with her right now? How close is she to that?

DAVID FOLKENFLIK: She's been unhappy at being blamed for CBS' problems in the evening news, and they've been unhappy with the big paycheck they've been handing her without significant rise in ratings.

NORRIS: What legacy has she built in her five years at CBS? It's hard to believe it's already been five years.

FOLKENFLIK: They're trying to cover stories in Japan, in the Middle East, all the tumult of all those countries there; wars in Iraq, in Afghanistan. These are expensive propositions, and what she did diverted resources. And that's been a real point of contention within the network.

NORRIS: You know, when you reach back to the era of Rather and Jennings and Brokaw, it seemed like getting an anchor job in the past was much like a lifetime appointment, much like a Supreme Court justice. What's changed now? These chairs seem to rotate so much more.

FOLKENFLIK: And therefore, it may be that Katie Couric, who's been the butt of jokes for her pay and ratings, who's been struggling a little bit within her own organization, may want to return to something that plays more to her strengths. And I think you're seeing, in some ways, the shrinking of the relevance of the major network news anchor.

NORRIS: That's NPR's David Folkenflik. David, thanks so much.

FOLKENFLIK: You bet.

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