NPR logo

Tweeted Verse Of The Day: April 15, 2011

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135440421/135440402" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Tweeted Verse Of The Day: April 15, 2011

Tweeted Verse Of The Day: April 15, 2011

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135440421/135440402" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, host:

And, next, Muses and Metaphor.

(Soundbite of music)

MARTIN: We've been hearing your poetic tweets on this program as part of National Poetry Month. We've been asking you to send us poems that are no more than 140 characters through Twitter. So far, hundreds of you have sent responses. Many said you joined Twitter just to be part of our poetry series.

Today, a tweet from Christine Chiosi. She lives in Philadelphia and writes poetry and short fiction. She also spends time in South America teaching English. Now, remember, these are short - only 140 characters each, so listen up.

Ms. CHRISTINE CHIOSI (Writer): My name is Christine Chiosi and this is my tweet.

(Reading) She gave up poetry for lent. She waited, a sequestered egg, oval stone, to see how death reverses, reemerges from a tomb.

MARTIN: Now, I know that went by really fast. So let's play it one more time.

Ms. CHIOSI: She gave up poetry for lent. She waited, a sequestered egg, oval stone, to see how death reverses, reemerges from a tomb.

MARTIN: That's a poetic tweet by Christine Chiosi. If you'd like to help us celebrate National Poetry Month, go to Twitter and tweet us your original poetry using fewer than 140 characters, of course. If your poem is chosen, we will help you record it for us and we will air it sometime this month. Tweet us using the hashtag TMMPoetry. You can learn more at the TELL ME MORE website, go to NPR.org, click on the Programs menu to find TELL ME MORE.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.