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LINDA WERTHEIMER, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

And joining us is puzzlemaster Will Shortz. Hi, Will.

WILL SHORTZ: Hi, Linda.

WERTHEIMER: You're speaking to us from member station WRNI in Providence, Rhode Island this week. What are you doing there?

SHORTZ: That's right. It's the 172nd convention of the National Puzzlers' League, which I'm directing. It's three days of word puzzles and games. Many of the country's top puzzle solvers and creators are here. And "The Today Show" was here Thursday night filming for an upcoming segment on puzzles.

WERTHEIMER: Son of a gun. Well, please, let's go back to our own puzzle here. Remind us of the challenge from last week.

SHORTZ: Yes, it came from listener Dale Shuger of New York City. I said, think of a common four-letter adjective, then take its opposite in French - and I said it's a French word everyone knows - if you say the two words out loud, one after the other, you'll name a famous film director. Who is it?

WERTHEIMER: Who is it?

SHORTZ: Answer is Truffaut, as in Francois Truffaut. And the words are true and faux. F-A-U-X, which is false in French.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

WERTHEIMER: We apparently had quite a few film buffs entering. More than 800 listeners submitted answers this week. And we randomly selected a winner, who is Brent Jeffers of Pullman, Washington. Hello, Brent.

BRENT JEFFERS: Hi, Linda. How are you?

WERTHEIMER: I'm good. What do you do in Pullman, Washington?

JEFFERS: I work for an engineering company, Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories. We design and manufacture digital protective products for electric power utilities and industrial sites.

WERTHEIMER: I guess by protective you mean to keep the power on kind of protective?

JEFFERS: Exactly.

WERTHEIMER: So how long did it take you to solve this puzzle?

JEFFERS: About a half hour.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

WERTHEIMER: Well, so are you ready to play again?

JEFFERS: I am.

WERTHEIMER: Will, meet Brent. And let's play.

SHORTZ: All right. Brent, every answer today is a word that ends in the letter F. I'll give you an anagram of the letters before the F. You tell me the word. For example, if I said flub, F-L-U-B, plus F, you would say bluff.

WERTHEIMER: I actually would've gotten that one.

SHORTZ: OK. Good.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SHORTZ: Here's number one.

WERTHEIMER: Maybe the only one.

SHORTZ: Number one is ward, W-A-R-D, plus F.

JEFFERS: Dwarf?

SHORTZ: Dwarf is right. Number two is cars, C-A-R-S, plus F.

WERTHEIMER: OK. I've got that. Ha.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SHORTZ: Something you wear.

JEFFERS: Go ahead, Linda.

WERTHEIMER: Scarf.

JEFFERS: Oh, scarf.

SHORTZ: Scarf is it. Good.

JEFFERS: I didn't catch the S.

SHORTZ: All right. Try this. Fast, F-A-S-T.

JEFFERS: Staff.

SHORTZ: Staff is it. Ashe, as in Arthur Ashe, A-S-H-E.

JEFFERS: Sheaf?

SHORTZ: Sheaf, as in a sheaf of paper. That's good. Fins. F-I-N-S.

JEFFERS: Sniff?

SHORTZ: Uh huh.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

WERTHEIMER: Very good.

SHORTZ: Good one. Aced. A-C-E-D.

JEFFERS: Decaf?

SHORTZ: Decaf as in decaf coffee. Good. Frug, the dance, frug. F-R-U-G.

JEFFERS: Gruff?

SHORTZ: Gruff is it. Uh huh.

WERTHEIMER: Right.

SHORTZ: Tiles. T-I-L-E-S.

JEFFERS: Hmm. T-I-L-E-S.

SHORTZ: The answer here is simplicity itself.

JEFFERS: Any help, Linda?

WERTHEIMER: No. I'm no good.

SHORTZ: All right. Well, I just gave you the answer. It's itself.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

JEFFERS: Oh, itself. OK. OK.

SHORTZ: All right. How's this: fisher. F-I-S-H-E-R, plus F.

WERTHEIMER: Now that one I got.

JEFFERS: Fresh, fish.

SHORTZ: No.

WERTHEIMER: As in I shot the...

JEFFERS: Sheriff.

SHORTZ: Sheriff is it. Good.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

JEFFERS: Thank you, Linda.

SHORTZ: How about this: fat slob. F-A-T S-L-O-B, plus F.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SHORTZ: Fat slob. And this one also ends in a double F.

WERTHEIMER: Fat slob.

JEFFERS: Blast off.

SHORTZ: Blast off is it.

WERTHEIMER: Oh, as in the shuttle, which did.

JEFFERS: Right.

SHORTZ: Excellent. Excellent. And here's your last one. The answer is a familiar two-word phrase. And your anagram is bare toes. B-A-R-E T-O-E-S. Bare toes as in once you take your shoes off you have bare toes. B-A-R-E T-O-E-S, plus F. It's a two-word phrase. And I'll give you a hint. It's something to eat.

WERTHEIMER: I'm no help. No help at all.

SHORTZ: And I'll tell you it's a...

JEFFERS: Roast beef.

SHORTZ: Roast beef.

WERTHEIMER: Yeah.

SHORTZ: You didn't need any more hints.

WERTHEIMER: Fabulous.

SHORTZ: Nice job.

JEFFERS: Thank you. That was fun.

WERTHEIMER: Now, for playing the puzzle today, you get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, plus some puzzle books and games that you can read about on our website, NPR.org/puzzle. What member station do you listen to, Brent?

JEFFERS: I'm a member and I listen to KWSU 1250 in Pullman and go Cougs.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

WERTHEIMER: Brent Jeffers, Pullman, Washington. Thank you very much for playing the puzzle this week.

JEFFERS: Thank you, Linda. Thanks, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks a lot.

WERTHEIMER: So, Will, the challenge for next week?

SHORTZ: Yes. This week's challenge comes from listener Ben Bass of Chicago. Name a classic television show in two words, eight letters. Remove one letter from each word, the remaining six letters, in order, will spell the last name of a well-known writer. Who is it?

So again, a classic TV show in two words, eight letters. Remove one letter from each word. The remaining six letters, in order, will spell the last name of a well-known writer. Who is it?

WERTHEIMER: When you have the answer, go to our website, NPR.org/puzzle and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Only one entry per person, please; our deadline is Thursday at 3 P.M. Eastern time. And we need a telephone number where we can reach you at about that time. We'll call you if you're the winner. And you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster, Will Shortz.

Fun as always, Will. Thank you very much.

SHORTZ: Thanks a lot, Linda.

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