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Libyan Rebels, Regime Put Attention On Gharyan

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Libyan Rebels, Regime Put Attention On Gharyan

Libyan Rebels, Regime Put Attention On Gharyan

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MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Michele Norris.

ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

But as NPR's Corey Flintoff found, the real extent of that support is unclear.

COREY FLINTOFF: In a bid to show local support for the regime, Libyan government minders took a busload of foreign reporters to Gharyan on Sunday, showing them a local market and staging a pro-Gadhafi demonstration.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHANTING MEN)

FLINTOFF: Inside, about a dozen women posed with weapons and said they were preparing to fight any rebel or NATO attack.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHANTING WOMEN AND GUNFIRE)

FLINTOFF: But Ismael says the strikes have also killed civilians.

ISMAEL: Two kilometers, you can see too much hole left on sides of streets. And two men died there. Two men dead.

FLINTOFF: Civilians?

ISMAEL: Yes.

FLINTOFF: Asked how many civilians have been killed, Ismael says this is what he's heard on the pro-Gadhafi State TV channels.

ISMAEL: I think 4,000.

FLINTOFF: Here?

ISMAEL: I think 4,000 here and Zintan, because Gharyan big city. Too much, every day. Every day. Every day, eh, people die. Why? Why? Why? Why?

FLINTOFF: After the visit to Gharyan, the government minders took reporters to the small nearby town of al-Asabeah, where there was a much bigger and more energetic demonstration in favor of the government.

(SOUNDBITE OF GUNFIRE)

FLINTOFF: Corey Flintoff, NPR News, Tripoli.

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