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MELISSA BLOCK, host:

Most of us have had this experience. We hear a sound and find ourselves transported back to a special time and place. That's the nature of today's sound clip.

Ms. MARY BISHOP (Resident, Roanoke, Virginia): My name is Mary Bishop and I live in Roanoke, Virginia. I'm a retired newspaper reporter. My parents both died in the last few years, and my husband and I were left with all their things. And among those things was a little aluminum bucket.

(Soundbite of aluminum bucket jangling)

Ms. BISHOP: This was the bucket. My dad, who's a farmer, used to bring milk and cream to our house.

(Soundbite of aluminum bucket jangling)

Ms. BISHOP: When I jangled it, I could just see him taking that bucket out the backdoor of our farmhouse and heading out the gate across the yard. And across the field, there was a little path leading from our yard to the dairy barn.

(Soundbite of aluminum bucket jangling)

Ms. BISHOP: And every day, he would take this bucket down and milk the cows and sometimes a separate milk can bring up either milk or cream in the bucket. And come in the backdoor, my mom would put it in pitchers and then she'd wash it out for him and he'd take it back again. And so I could just see him. He had scoliosis so his back was curved and we had the sound of a little metal bucket saying that daddy's home and it's time to eat.

(Soundbite of aluminum bucket jangling)

BLOCK: Mary Bishop of Roanoke, Virginia with an audio memory, her father's milking bucket. If you have a sound clip, tell us about it and we'll contact you. Learn more at npr.org.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

This is NPR, National Public Radio.

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