Copyright ©2011 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

DAVID GREENE, host:

If your wallet's bulging, well, maybe you're rich; maybe you just have a lot of credit cards. For a lot of people, it's a pile of crumpled receipts taking up all that space. Of course, you can never find that one receipt when you need it most. Well, some retailers have a high-tech solution to your problems.

Gigi Douban reports.

GIGI DOUBAN: It all happened so fast.

(Soundbite of beep)

DOUBAN: You've been waiting in the checkout line. Then finally, it's your turn.

Unidentified Woman: You're going to get back $10 and a nickel.

(Soundbite of clicking sound)

DOUBAN: And just when you think you're through, the sales clerk pops the question.

Unidentified Woman: And can I have your email address, please?

(Soundbite of keys clicking)

Unidentified Woman: All right.

(Soundbite of printout)

Unidentified Woman: And this is your receipt. You can look for special deals in your email address now. And we will also send your receipt of this purchase.

DOUBAN: More retailers like this Old Navy store in Birmingham, Alabama, are emailing receipts to customers. Others stores, like Nordstrom and Patagonia, do the same. Sometimes, it's instead of a paper receipt but most of the time, customers get both. Apple has been doing this for years now.

This summer, Gap Inc., which owns Old Navy and Banana Republic, launched e-receipts at more than 2,600 stores. Shelley Perelmuter is Gap's vice president of customer relations management. She says e-receipts are convenient.

Ms. SHELLEY PERELMUTER (Gap, Inc.): We saw a number of people coming in with wallets stuffed with old receipts. And returns can sometimes be a hassle for someone who's time-starved. So we just thought, let's think of a way to make this more convenient and streamlined for the customer, and also go a little bit greener.

DOUBAN: Saving paper is really more like a bonus. The driving force is actually branding. Ilya Mezheritsky is with Seamless Receipts, a company that designs e-receipts.

Mr. ILYA MEZHERUTSKY (Seamless Receipts): It's an opportunity to connect with their customers, to participate on the social networks, to review their products, to visit their sites, to read their news.

DOUBAN: Sometimes users have to opt in for such marketing programs. With Seamless e-receipts, that can be as easy - or accidental - as clicking on a graphic in the e-receipt.

At Gap Inc. stores, once you give the sales clerk your email address, you're automatically opted in. Company officials say you can always opt out later. But like reward cards, e-receipts give retailers another way to track shopping behavior, and that's worth money. If a company knows how you shop, it knows which products to push to your email inbox, and when.

Just outside that Old Navy store in Birmingham, Jillian Houston loads up her twin toddlers into her SUV, and whips out her Blackberry. What happens next seems to her almost magical.

Ms. JILLIAN HOUSTON: They say, your receipt - OK, I received one, a confirmation showing that I did purchase, and what items I did purchase. So I guess Old Navy does work.

DOUBAN: This was Houston's first e-receipt. She says she likes that it won't fade. She's not too worried about spam. She keeps a separate email address for shopping and online contests. And experts say if keeping up with multiple accounts isn't your thing, you can always just say no.

For NPR News, I'm Gigi Douban in Birmingham.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: