Sick Of Young Adult Lit? 3 Books For The Whiz Kid As we grow older, our reading changes. The alphabet books of our toddler years just aren't going to cut it after college. But author Adam Mansbach revisits three books from his young adult years and finds that the best stories can be appreciated at any age.
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Sick Of Young Adult Lit? 3 Books For The Whiz Kid

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Sick Of Young Adult Lit? 3 Books For The Whiz Kid

Sick Of Young Adult Lit? 3 Books For The Whiz Kid

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/139854715/140264675" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

A: Mansbach recently revisited some of his childhood favorites, and he found to his surprise, that they are still just as good as he remembers. Here he is for our series Three Books.

ADAM MANSBACH: For the Carnegie-esque Pittsburgh clan in "Father's Arcane Daughter" by E.L. Konigsburg, time stopped years ago when the family's eldest daughter was kidnapped. Now, a grown woman claiming to be the long-gone Caroline has returned. She's embraced by the family, even as doubts linger in the mind of her young half-brother Winston. Soon, it becomes clear that Caroline is there to unlock the cage of fear in which Winston and his younger sister have been forced to live. Atmospheric but never stuffy, this is a finely wrought mystery as well as a meditation on the truths we choose to live with and the truths we choose to live without.

SIEGEL: Returning to these three books reminds me of why I fell in love with reading. Pick one up and lose yourself in it. Why should kids have all the fun?

SIEGEL: Adam Mansbach is author of the book "Go the Blank to Sleep." For more on his reading recommendations, you can go to our website, npr.org.

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