Three Books For The Truly Fearless Frequent Flier Terrified of flying? Join the club. Author Chris Bohjalian is, too, but he encourages you to confront those fears and indulge in these three books that share the tale of moments high in the sky and the tension when something goes terribly wrong.
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Three Books For The Truly Fearless Frequent Flier

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Three Books For The Truly Fearless Frequent Flier

Three Books For The Truly Fearless Frequent Flier

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MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

We are told to face our fears. If you have a fear of flying, writer Chris Bohjalian has a suggestion for you - actually, three suggestions - all books about plane crashes. Here's Bohjalian's pitch for reading about the thing that scares you.

CHRIS BOHJALIAN: Nigel Farndale's "The Blasphemer" is a tale of an adamant atheist and his great-grandfather, a World War I deserter, but the novel hinges on a small aircraft that ditches near the Galapagos Islands. While Langewiesche spends his time on the flight deck, Farndale brings the reader back into the passenger cabin, where the panic and utter helplessness are palpable. I remember the way I opened my window blind when the fictional plane experiences its first violent jolt. Just like the fellow in the novel, I gazed back at the engine on my side of the aircraft and studied the wing.

BLOCK: That's Chris Bohjalian. His latest novel is "The Night Strangers." You could find a lot more reading recommendations at our website. That's npr.org/books.

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