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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish. And time now for the puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

CORNISH: We begin with last week's challenge from puzzle editor of the New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master Will Shortz.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Name something that is part of a group of 12. Change the first letter to the next letter of the alphabet to name something that is part of a group of nine. What are these things?

CORNISH: We received more than 800 entries, and our randomly selected winner is Oren Helbok of Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania. And he's going to join us soon, but first I want to say hello to Will Shortz, puzzle editor of the New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master Will Shortz. Hey there, Will. Welcome back.

SHORTZ: Hi, Audie. Good to talk to you.

CORNISH: So, I remember this summer when I was in your house, you had all of these great puzzles that you had gotten, like, on eBay and stuff. And just the other day I was wondering if you've gotten any fun purchases.

SHORTZ: I get new stuff all the time. I go to shows, dealers send me things and I do buy a lot on eBay. And I got a book from 1814 that I'd like to share parts of with you on the puzzle today.

CORNISH: Oh my gosh. That's so cool. Well, we should meet our puzzle player. Oren Helbok, congratulations.

OREN HELBOK: Thank you very much.

CORNISH: Welcome to the program.

HELBOK: Thank you.

SHORTZ: Hi, Oren. Congratulations on getting the answer.

HELBOK: Thank you very much.

CORNISH: Oren, what was the answer to last week's challenge?

HELBOK: The answer to last week's challenge was Cancer the crab and Dancer the reindeer.

CORNISH: Great job, and congratulations.

HELBOK: Thank you.

CORNISH: So, Will, I think we're all warmed up and I would love to know what this week's puzzle is going to be.

SHORTZ: All right, Oren and Audie. This is a good two-person puzzle, because I've brought some riddles from this 1814 book called "The New Collection of Riddles." And here's number one, and feel free to brainstorm with each other. There is not a kingdom on the earth but I have traveled oar and oar. And though I know, not whence my birth, yet when I come you know my roar. I threw the town to take my flight and through the fields and meadows green, and whether it be day or night, I neither am or can be seen.

HELBOK: I think I have an idea on that one. I'm going to say the wind.

SHORTZ: The wind. That was fast. Good going.

CORNISH: Well then. Good job, Oren.

SHORTZ: Number two: Without a bridle or a saddle, across a thing I ride astraddle. And those I ride by help of me, though almost blind are made to see.

HELBOK: That one is not coming to me nearly so quickly.

SHORTZ: All right. Let's try it again. Without a bridle or a saddle, across a thing I ride astraddle. And those I ride by help of me, though almost blind are made to see.

HELBOK: Oh, eyeglasses.

SHORTZ: Eyeglasses, spectacles, right. They straddle the bridge of the nose, good.

CORNISH: Oh, clever.

SHORTZ: Good. OK. Now I have to tell you we're getting harder.

HELBOK: OK.

CORNISH: Oh, no. That was the easy stuff?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SHORTZ: Those are the easy ones. No mouth, no eyes nor yet a nose, two arms, two feet, and as it goes, the feet 'tis said, don't touch the ground, but all the way the head runs 'round. So, let me summarize that. This is something that doesn't have a mouth, eyes or a nose. It does have two arms and two feet. As it goes, the feet don't touch the ground, but the head runs round. What is it?

HELBOK: The head runs round. Two arms and two feet.

SHORTZ: Right. But which it goes...yeah.

HELBOK: Initially I was thinking of a clock, but I couldn't put the feet into that.

SHORTZ: Right. Yeah, the thing has two feet.

HELBOK: The (unintelligible) arms.

SHORTZ: And the strange thing is, when the thing goes, the feet don't touch the ground.

CORNISH: And this is something from the 1800s as well, we should say, right?

SHORTZ: It is something from 1814, but you still see these today.

CORNISH: OK.

HELBOK: OK. So, it's a thing. It's not like the feet in a poem, metrical feet.

SHORTZ: No. It's not metaphorical. These are literally feet, although they don't look like yours and mine.

HELBOK: No, I'm afraid this one is not coming to me.

SHORTZ: Sounds like I stumped you guys. I'm going to have to tell you, it's a wheelbarrow.

HELBOK: Oh.

SHORTZ: It doesn't have a mouth, eyes or nose. It has two arms that you hold. The two feet - you lift them up when the thing goes. And, of course, the head is the wheel at the front that runs around as you know as a wheelbarrow.

HELBOK: OK.

CORNISH: Oh, that was a good one.

SHORTZ: OK. I've got one more for you. What is that which has been tomorrow and will be yesterday? That's the whole riddle. What is that which has been tomorrow and will be yesterday?

HELBOK: Today.

SHORTZ: Today, is it. Good job.

CORNISH: Very good job, Oren. Oren, for playing our puzzle today, you're going to get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin as well as puzzle books and games that you can read about at NPR.org/Puzzle. And, Oren, which member station do you listen to?

HELBOK: I listen to WVIA from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre and WITF from Harrisburg.

CORNISH: Thank you so much for being a listener. And thank you for playing the puzzle this week, Oren.

HELBOK: It's been a pleasure. Thank you very much.

CORNISH: So, Will, tell us what's the challenge for next week.

SHORTZ: Yes, think of a familiar two-word rhyming phrase starting with the letter F, like: fat cat, fun run, fine line or flower power. Change the initial F to a G and you'll get another familiar two-word rhyming phrase. What phrases are these?

So again, a familiar two-word rhyming phrase starts with the letter F, like: fat cat, fun run, fine line or flower power. Change that F to a G and you'll get another familiar two-word rhyming phrase. What phrases are these?

CORNISH: All right, folks, when you have the answer, go to our website, NPR.org/puzzle and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Just one entry per person, please. And our deadline for entries is Thursday, October 20th at 3 P.M. Eastern Time. Please include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner we'll give you a call, and you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle-master, Will Shortz.

Will, thanks so much.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Audie.

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