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A Survivor's Duty After Pearl Harbor: Telling The Story

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A Survivor's Duty After Pearl Harbor: Telling The Story

America

A Survivor's Duty After Pearl Harbor: Telling The Story

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

One final note from StoryCorps. A few weeks ago we heard from Frank Curre, the Navy veteran shared his painful story of surviving the attack on Pearl Harbor.

FRANK CURRE: I still have the nightmares. I never got over the nightmares. And with God as my witness, I read my paper this morning and right now I can't tell you what I read. I can't remember it. But what happened on that day is tattooed on your soul. There's no way I can forget that. I wish to God I could.

WERTHEIMER: Frank Curre died Wednesday, 70 years to the day after he experienced the events that haunted him. In life he regarded himself as a messenger of Pearl Harbor's story; part of the reason he said the good lord saved him and the other survivors. There are several tributes to Frank Curre at npr.org. One reads: I hope that his shipmates are there to welcome him into their honored gathering.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

WERTHEIMER: This is NPR News.

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