Cabinet Of WondersCabinet Of Wonders

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JOHN WESLEY HARDING, HOST:

Welcome to the CABINET OF WONDERS from NPR.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: Yes. We're recording at Manhattan's City Winery. The Cabinet is alive and open for inspection tonight with music, word and even comedy.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: Human jukebox, Twitter award winner, Indie rock royalty Mr. Ted Leo will sing for you tonight.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: We've got Audrey Niffenegger, author of one of my favorite novels "The Time Traveler's Wife" and "The Night Bookmobile", the most beautiful graphic novel of recent years.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: And that is not all. The CABINET is spilling over with singer Nicole Atkins and a guest appearance by Sean Nelson, once of Harvey Danger. And the funniest man in the room, Eugene Mirman. And the house band for one night only featuring currently unemployed Peter Buck, currently on hiatus, members of the Decemberists.

Ladies and gentlemen, I'm John Wesley Harding. Stay with us, THE CABINET OF WONDERS is open for business.

(SOUNDBITE OF LIVE MUSIC)

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: Welcome back to THE CABINET OF WONDERS on NPR, because the time is right for a little variety.

When the children have been good, that is, be it understood good at meal times, good at play, good all night and good all day, they shall have the pretty things this CABINET OF WONDERS brings. But, naughty romping girls and boys, who tear their clothes and make a noise, spoil their pinafores and sheets, and deserve no special treats: such as these, will never yet enjoy this special CABINET. The door is locked, your money is spent. May I present The CABINET, its contents and its dis-contents?

(SOUNDBITE OF LIVE MUSIC)

HARDING: Ladies and gentlemen, might I announce that we are taping tonight's performance for NPR.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: To my right, the greatest friend of The CABINET and one of New York's funniest, Mr. Eugene Mirman. Eugene Mirman.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: Now, I said to Eugene, will you ever play music with me on a stage, and Eugene said -

EUGENE MIRMAN: Sort of.

HARDING: And then...

MIRMAN: And I said...

HARDING: ... and then you said...

MIRMAN: I've always had a fantasy of doing one-liner jokes and playing like an instrument like a lot of comedians do. So we've come to a mutual middle ground where what I'll do is I'll play the theremin as Wes and I read tweets.

HARDING: Are you good at the theremin?

MIRMAN: I'm, I don't play it wrong.

(LAUGHTER)

MIRMAN: But I don't play it right. Let's give it a little whirl.

HARDING: Okay.

(SOUNDBITE OF EUGENE MIRMAN PLAYING THE THEREMIN)

MIRMAN: Okay, that's a theremin. So I'll read the first tweet.

HARDING: Yes.

MIRMAN: News fact: the NYPD threw away the donated Occupy Wall Street Library because four copies of Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal" attacked three officers.

(SOUNDBITE OF EUGENE MIRMAN PLAYING THE THEREMIN)

HARDING: I just asked my 5-year-old daughter to complete the following Beatles' title: "Abbey..." Her hopeful reply: "Abbey Rosen?" It's true.

(SOUNDBITE OF EUGENE MIRMAN PLAYING THE THEREMIN)

MIRMAN: Wow, I just found out that Lou Reed and Metallica met through Linked-In.

(SOUNDBITE OF EUGENE MIRMAN PLAYING THE THEREMIN)

HARDING: The best thing about these Dr. Dre headphones is that they keep your ears warm. Mind you, he is a doctor.

(SOUNDBITE OF EUGENE MIRMAN PLAYING THE THEREMIN)

MIRMAN: So disappointed that "Water for Elephants" is not about a fair and mutually agreed upon exchange between two groups of circus people.

(SOUNDBITE OF EUGENE MIRMAN PLAYING THE THEREMIN)

HARDING: Me: I just got you a present from the Apple Store. 5-year old child: I know what it is. A Honeycrisp?

(SOUNDBITE OF EUGENE MIRMAN PLAYING THE THEREMIN)

(LAUGHTER)

HARDING: Ladies and gentlemen, he'll be back with his amazing theremin moves, Mr. Eugene Mirman.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: Will you please welcome to the stage The King Charles Trio.

This is the song on which my daughter is the first voice you hear, and she goes...

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "UNCLE DAD")

HARDING: Mom, he's here.

THE KING CHARLES TRIO: (Singing) He comes a-knocking on a Friday night, with a box of Black Magic and a bottle of white. And if she's with him she waits outside. We can watch her do her lipstick in the passenger light. Oh mum gets quiet, mum gets sad. She sits in the kitchen lost in the want ads.

(Singing) Mum, she makes the breakfast, walks us all to school. Works at the municipal swimming pool. It's sad he moved so far away. We're doing up his house now so we can stay. Oh how we smiled, how we laughed, when he turned up in a sports car. No one's quite as much fun as Uncle. No one's quite as much fun as Uncle. No one's quite as much as fun as Uncle Dad. He's there without warning. He's gone in the morning. It never gets boring. Uncle Dad.

(Singing) Careful where you tiptoe on the firing range. Gets a little tense at the hostage exchange. Not all the hostages want to go. I'm the peacemaker so I go with the flow. Oh, out to the car and in the back seat, on with the seat belts, out with the sweets. And no one's quite as much fun as Uncle, no one's quite as much fun as Uncle, no one's quite as much fun as Uncle Dad. He's there in the driveway. Blimey it's Friday. His car is untidy. Uncle Dad.

(Singing) I remember once when he came in for a drink and he was there in the morning. Sitting in the kitchen with a mug of instant coffee, yawning. Mum was smiling when we went to school. Later, she was in mourning.

(Singing) It's always presents and it's always treats. Back home it's TV and it's just repeats. She says he thinks that life's one long cartoon. He really wishes mum would get a boyfriend soon. Oh yeah, we like her, Aunty Jane. And we can't wait to get home again, no. No one's quite as much fun as Uncle. No one's quite as much fun as Uncle. Ah. No one's quite as much fun as Uncle Dad. He's there without warning, he's gone in the morning. It never gets boring. Uncle Dad.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: May I introduce from The Decemberists, Christopher Funk on lead guitar.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: Also from The Decemberists, on the drums, he sings like a bird, Mr. John Moen on the drums. John Moen.

On the bass guitar, Nate Query.

On the keyboards, you love her, Jenny Conlee. Jennifer Conlee Drizos.

On the 12-string guitar, please welcome, currently unemployed, Mr. Peter Buck. Peter Buck.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: And the lead singer of the Minus Five and the Young Fresh Fellows, one of America's great songwriters here to sing for you purely as my backing vocalist. Emasculated at last. Will you please welcome Scott McCoy.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: And before I bring on the, the first guest, we'd like to play you a little Procol Harum, or as we call them England, Procol Harem.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "RAMBLING ON")

HARDING: (Singing) A local picture house was playing a Batman movie. See this guy fly up in the sky and I thought to myself, why shouldn't I? So I bought a pair of wings. Went up upon a wall. I was about to jump into the air when a man from the street called. He said, wait a minute! Don't you realize the danger? What do you think you are; some kind of angel? I considered for a minute, thought he only spoke the truth. For the barbells on my eyelids only emphasized my youth. And the sawdust in my plimsolls meant the same to him as me.

(Singing) But that's neither here nor further, so I spoke considerately. I you understand just what I'm trying to say, Don't grin now, you'll give the game away! By now a crowd had gathered and it seemed that all was lost. In the anger of the moment I had diced with death and lost. It seemed to me the time was right so I burst into song. In the anger of the moment the crowd began to sing along.

(Singing I could not see a way out of this predicament. Just then a breeze blew the trees, up in the air I went, up in the air. Here I go.

(Singing) I must have flown a mile, or maybe it was eight. Thought to myself pretty soon now, I'm going to hit the Golden Gates. Just then a passing bird for no reason I could see. Took a peck at my wings and that was the end of me. Well I flew down, hit the ground faster than the speed of sound. Luckily I broke no bones only tore my underclothes.

(Singing) Yeah, that's the way it was.

(Singing) I'm rambling on and on and on and on and on again. Rambling on.

(Singing) Three.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: Ladies and gentlemen, the astonishing King Charles Trio, they'll be back.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: We have a lot of good cover versions for you this evening coming up. Each of the people playing tonight I've written a little poem for. The best ever limerick, in my opinion, is there was a young man from Japan, whose limericks would never scan, when asked why it was, he said it's because I always try and fit as many words into the last line as I possibly can.

This was replaced recently by a better limerick, which is, there was a young man from Peru, whose limericks end online two.

(LAUGHTER)

HARDING: Now that's a good limerick. I didn't write that. That's just quality stuff I'm bringing to you. There was a young lady called Audrey, about who I'm writing bad poetry. Her books are divine and great favorites of mine, but this limerick is tactless and tawdry. Author, of one of the great novels of the last few years I believe, and I'm sure you've read it and you love it too. Author of The Time Traveler's Wife, one of my favorites, please will you welcome Audrey Niffenegger.

AUDREY NIFFENEGGER: Well yowzer. I've been kind of preoccupied for the last week or so because I found out that my most favorite book store on the planet is going to close. And this would be the fabulous Bookman's Alley in Evanston, Illinois. So I sat down and wrote a piece called "Requiem for a Bookshop" and I should begin by pointing out that while Bookman's Alley is a real place and Roger Carlson, its proprietor, is a real person, I don't have permission to do this, so I hope he doesn't sue me or anything.

I should also mention that the other two characters in here, Mr. Openshaw and Alexandra, are characters from a previous piece of mine called "The Night Bookmobile" in which Alexandra discovers that not only does she have her own personal bookmobile that contains everything she's ever read, but that it emanates from a place called The Library which is essentially heaven, and contains all the books ever by anyone. So.

(Reading) Mr. Openshaw stood in the alley outside the newly defunct bookshop. It was just after midnight and New Year's Eve was now the new year. I could hear fireworks and gunshots in the distance. There was a thin layer of snow on the ground and I stuck out my tongue to catch a stray snowflake as I walked down the alley. Mr. Openshaw was silhouetted by the light of the bookshop window. He turned to me and beckoned. We looked through the window at the man who sat at the front desk. Roger Carlson was a fine looking old gentleman, still tall and rangy with an enviable full head of white hair and clear blue eyes.

(Reading) Tonight, he sat leaning on his elbows, chin propped in his hands, staring blankly into the depths of his shop. I looked at Mr. Openshaw. He nodded. I rapped on the window. Roger started and squinted at us. I bent and put my face close to the glass. Roger beamed at me and shook his head. "Why, I heard you had died." "Yeah," I said, "that's kind of why I'm here tonight." I wasn't sure what to say. I'd never done this before.

(Reading) "This is Robert Openshaw, he's my colleague at The Library." Roger nodded. "You work with Alexandra at the Solzer?" "No," said Mr. Openshaw, "we both work for The Library now. We're in the acquisitions department." I handed Roger my card. It read, "The Library, Alexandra Openshaw, Librarian. Hours: eternity." Roger glanced at the card again. "You work for an eternal library?" "We're dead," Mr. Openshaw said, "we've got all the time in the world. And all the books ever written. It's quite a complete collection."

(Reading) Roger smiled at me, ruefully. "So you've... come for me?" "No," I said, "we've come for your bookshop." I gestured at the interior of the shop, which was ordinarily pretty orderly and quite inviting. Tonight, it looked as though it had been burgled. Books were heaped in piles on the floor willy-nilly. There were empty shelves. The comfy chairs were full of old magazines, and cardboard boxes were stacked in ominous piles, ready to be filled with all the unsold and unwanted books.

(Reading) The shop was called Bookman's Alley. It was 31 years old and tonight it had died. It was the bookshop of my youth. I had brought boyfriends here, had spent hours dreaming and wandering through these labyrinthine aisles of bookshelves. Bookman's Alley sold used and rare books. They never had a website, never sold a single volume on Amazon or AbeBooks. The shop had been left behind by an electronic world.

(Reading) "We've come to collect the soul of your bookshop for The Library, if that's OK with you," I said. "Once it's part of The Library's collection it will be open 24/7 for infinity." "I'd like that," Roger said. Mr. Openshaw had brought a bottle of champagne and three glasses. We toasted Bookman's Alley and the New Year. Then I asked Roger if he was ready and he nodded. Mr. Openshaw took a tiny purple velvet box out of his pocket. It was the kind of thing an engagement ring might come in. He opened it as though he were about to propose.

(Reading) "Will it fit in there?" asked Roger, "it's so small. I would have thought a bookshop's soul would take up more space." Mr. Openshaw smiled. "It really has no mass at all. It's pure energy." Mr. Openshaw stood and held out his hands to the bookshop. An invisible, silent transformation began. The space inside the box suddenly became intensely desirable, peaceful, beloved. It was as though all knowledge, all longing for home, all rest and beauty, all art, music, botany, history, math, science and sex had converged on the little velvet box.

(Reading) Mr. Openshaw closed his hands and we looked around at the bookshop. It was desolate. The books were only paper and board, common books that no one loved. It no longer smelled of leather and dust. "Are you leaving now?" Roger said. I caught Mr. Openshaw's eye. "We can stay all night," I said to Roger. "Have some more champagne and tell us stories. Tell us about Bookman's Alley from the very beginning."

(Reading) We all settled in and began to hold a wake as the snow piled up against the door and sporadic fireworks punctuated the night. The soul of the bookshop was safe in Mr. Openshaw's pocket, ready and waiting for any reader who might like to browse there on some remote afternoon in eternity. Thank you.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: Ladies and gentlemen, Audrey Niffenegger. Excuse us just for a moment, we're going backstage for a bit of toast and a jam. While Nicole Atkins tunes up. I just added that bit, ad lib. I just put an indefinite article right in there.

AUDIENCE: Brilliant

HARDING: It was good. When you're back we expect to find you still here. You're listening to NPR.

(APPLAUSE)

(SOUNDBITE OF LIVE MUSIC)

HARDING: Welcome back to THE CABINET OF WONDERS on NPR. At the suggestion of A.C. Newman, a man of considerable acumen, you're bound to be enthralled, if not please blame Carl or yourself. If you like it moody and quiet but you yearn for noise and hunger for riot, may I recommend the Atkins diet? Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the very wonderful Nicole Atkins.

(APPLAUSE)

NICOLE ATKINS: Thanks. Good to see you guys. So I'm going to play a bunch of songs about not lending money to people that you aren't married to. This first one was written by a very, very good friend of mine named Robert Harrison.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "MONTERREY HONEY")

ATKINS: (Singing) We bought gas grills and stoves, 14 Exit Congo Road. That was four thousand miles from our natural home. And I laughed when he asked, does he really look good? I wish I had that one back 'cause I'd tell him yes, like nobody else could. Gone broke in time was our money. I gave it all to my Monterrey Honey. I learned about the great temptations. I'm lost where no one can find me. I think of him and my future's behind me. So now I'm back to join the great parade.

(Singing) He asked me, aren't you done yet? Then broke my heart with his last cigarette. There are some things a girl tries so hard to forget. Like that face that he made when I knew things had changed. Now he's gone, I've marched on to some secret song that can't drown out his name.

(Singing) Gone broke in time was our money. I gave it all to my Monterrey Honey. I learned about the great temptations. I'm going where no one can find me. I think of him and my future's behind me. So now I'm back to join the great, I'm back to join the great parade, so now I'm back to join the great parade.

(APPLAUSE)

ATKINS: Thank you. Thank you.

HARDING: Ladies and gentlemen, Nicole Atkins, who will now be accompanied by The King Charles Trio.

ATKINS: So it's like I don't have to play guitar any more.

This song is called Hotel Plaster. Me and Jenny are going to start off.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "HOTEL PLASTER")

ATKINS: (Singing) Don't shake the change out of your pockets in the boudoir. That might wake someone there beside you who would scold you, boy. My pain can learn to play the violin, but it might not bring you back. At least we'd have a pretty soundtrack. Think of me in a prison of hotel plaster. Far from the shelter of your side. Take me back to the rocking horse, pray for answers. Hold on to our light. Hold on to our light.

(Singing) Don't leave your lover waiting all night by the window. She might not be the kind who would forgive you when the meal gets cold. I know we've hurt each other pretty bad. But this midnight horoscope, tells me there's a little more hope. Think of me in a prison of hotel plaster, far from the shelter of your side. We broke a diamond with our bitter words, hold on to our light. Think of me in a prison of hotel plaster, far from the shelter of your side. We broke a diamond with our bitter words. Hold on to our light. Hold on to our light.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: Ladies and gentlemen, Nicole Atkins.

And on the tambourine, Audrey Niffenegger. I love it when the writers come on. Ladies and gentlemen, The King Charles Trio. Give them a round of applause.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: You know, sometimes really beautiful things happen with The CABINET, which is when an old friend rings up or emails, as people tend to do nowadays, and says I'm in town, would you like a hand. Will you please welcome to the stage, poemless but in no way unappreciated, Mr. Once of Harvey Danger, Mr. Sean Nelson. Sean Nelson.

(APPLAUSE)

SEAN NELSON: Thank you. I think it's safe to say there aren't very many artists who can be said to define their century. And I mean, I know what you're thinking and it's very generous, but I think that the 21st century is young yet, but. You know, there's your Beethovens and your Shakespeares and the guy who invented reality TV. But I think that the band that I'm going to play a song by is definitely on my list for bands that sort of are the 20th century in my mind. But this is a song, yes?

HARDING: Get a move on!

NELSON: Sorry, did you guys hear something? The radio might be tuned kind of in between two stations and so it sounds like somebody is telling me to play a song and stop talking, but that's really just a pledge drive on the other station.

And by all means, you know, make a contribution and be generous.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "THE PORPOISE SONG")

NELSON: (Singing) My, my, the clock in the sky is pounding away, there's so much to say. A face, a voice, an overdub has no choice, an image cannot rejoice. Wanting to be, to hear and to see. Crying to the skies. But the porpoise is waiting goodbye, goodbye. Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye.

(Singing) Clicks, clacks, right in the backs of giraffes for laughs, all right for a while. The ego sings of castles and kings and things that go with a life of style. Wanting to feel, to know what is real. Living is nice. But the porpoise is waiting goodbye, goodbye. Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye. Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye. Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye.

NELSON: Thank you very much.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: You're listening to THE CABINET OF WONDERS. We have a few tricks yet up our sleeves. Don't go away.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: You're so nice to do that.

(SOUNDBITE OF LIVE MUSIC)

HARDING: This is THE CABINET OF WONDERS, where words, music and comedy get their seven minutes in heaven, lipstick stains and all. Thank you.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: Oh my goodness, the show is reaching its tawdry musical climax. Townsmen, cast your eyes on Mirman. No Australian Bruce or warlike German. Of Russian stock this comic sir. Like Yakov Smirnoff, only funnier. Ladies and gentlemen, it's your old friend Eugene Mirman.

(SOUNDBITE OF LIVE MUSIC)

MIRMAN: Ooh. You guys are top notch clappers. I was in London. I did a bunch of shows in London and one of the things that happened to me was I dislocated my shoulder. I fell down some stairs and had to go to the British emergency room, which was very nice. They just go like where do you live? And I'm like, America. They're like no problem. And then they bring me in and, and they, and they put me in one of their sweet hospital beds, and they gave me morphine. And they started giving me morphine. I looked at the doctor and I go, could you put on the Velvet Underground?

No. They didn't have it. They knew they'd be giving someone morphine that night. Not even on their iPhone. So ill-prepared British hospital.

I was in [unintelligible] and I saw that linens and things was going out of business. I know. So sad. I was like my first thought was should have been more specific. I live in Park Slope in Brooklyn and...

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

MIRMAN: Yes. And there's a health food natural store that opened next to me, and I went into it and there was this thing they were selling: Botanical Cures that I adored. This is one. It's called Impatiens. Let me see if I can read this tiny writing. Helps you deal with slow situations or people with good humor rather than impatience or irritability.

This is another one. Senturi. It helps you take care of your needs and assert yourself if you find it hard to say no to others. Like I don't know where the FDA comes in, but I feel very strongly that these have not been approved. So what I decided to do was that I would sell my own Eugene themed elixirs. This is one. I call it Slippers. They all have a name. This is to avoid running into someone you know when you're on the street and you need to go to the bathroom.

Here's another one. Silk Road. Helps interns deal with sexual harassment through a legal action instead of an awkward, bitter smile.

Well, that is the clap of an intern. Breezeway. Replaces the disappointment of having a self-destructive teenager with the feeling of watching "Die Hard" on a snowy Sunday afternoon.

(LAUGHTER)

MIRMAN: Hot Tox. This is to feel good about yourself after you had sex with someone you thought was awesome but then said something really dumb or kind of racist.

(LAUGHTER)

MIRMAN: I call this one Whispers and Pepper. Ooh, that's pretty. Replaces the feeling that your marriage is lacking affection with the memory of sledding.

(LAUGHTER)

MIRMAN: Lemon Whisper. Lets you take back trying to kiss your good friend who doesn't like you back. Aw. But that's a medicine you need, 17-year-olds.

(APPLAUSE)

MIRMAN: Thank you very, very much. I now bring you back to the wonderful John Wesley Harding.

HARDING: Yes. If he were a Pisces, he'd be facing some crises. If Taurus, he might forget the chorus. But O Sole Mio, he's Virgo, not Scorpio. Ladies and gents, it's Ted Leo.

(APPLAUSE)

TED LEO: Hiya. I tempted to crowd source what song I was going to play backstage earlier, and we did crowdsource it, and I said OK. And then about 30 seconds later when the crowd had left I was like, no I don't want to play that one, so. I'm going to play the other one actually.

It's called Bottled in Cork. Oh, and if you are familiar with it, like the great Paul Stanley once said, sometimes you want to sing along, but you don't think it's cool. Then you look over next to you and you see the cool person singing along and you're not. So, extrapolate, you know, help me out at the end.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "BOTTLED IN CORK")

LEO: (Singing) There was a resolution pending on the United Nations floor. In reference to the question, "What's a peacekeeping force for?" Who believed it would be solved in a day. No one who walked out of that building on the 8th of May in their tired-suited, worn-eyed way.

(Singing) I got a message from my sister, she just had a kid. I had to get to Copenhagen to see how she did. My haircut startled a Canadian, he called me a "skid". Though the charge for roaming the international's well hid. Someone is listening on my phone when I show up on the grid. Me - I'm just a loner in a world full of kids - egos, and ids. A year before we were getting in, getting bottled in Cork. On television, Congress crying about abusing the pork. I told the bartender we were all from New York. Sometimes the path of least resistance will gain you the most. More than trying to map the distances up and down the East Coast.

(Singing) When you're in Munich making music, raise your glass and say, "Prost!" Make it easy on your host.

(Singing) Over mountains and far away your tribunals' mockeries of justice still dog my steps till I see that next smiling face. A little good will goes a mighty long way. A little good will goes a mighty long way. I finally made it up to Sweden to see Little Dove. Some folks remembered our last meeting and bore me no grudge. And from the bartender, complimentary mugs! Oh, if only I could stay a while - what am I afraid of? All this psychic damage of all the years I'm made of. Tell the bartender I think I'm falling in love. Tell the bartender I think I'm falling in love. Tell the bartender I think I'm falling in love. Tell the bartender I think I'm falling in love.

(Singing) Tell the bartender I think I'm falling in love. Tell the bartender I think I'm falling in love. Tell the bartender I think I'm falling in love. Tell the bartender I think I'm falling in love. Tell the bartender I think I'm falling in love. Tell the bartender I think I'm falling in love. I'm falling in love. I'm falling in love. I'm falling in love. I'm falling in love. I'm falling in love. I'm falling in love. I'm falling in love. I'm falling in love. I'm falling in love. I'm falling in love. I'm falling in love. I'm falling in love. I'm falling in love.

(APPLAUSE)

LEO: Thanks. Warming up.

HARDING: Ted Leo.

LEO: Just warming up.

HARDING: We asked Ted to pick a cover song of his choice. He picked something wonderful... and complicated.

(LAUGHTER)

HARDING: And we've got a little Sean Nelson action back to help us with this song.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "BACK SEAT OF MY CAR")

LEO: (Singing) Speed along the skyway. Honey, I want it my way. But listen to her daddy's song. Don't stay out too long. But we were only hiding. Sitting in the back seat of my car. Looking for a ride and all about. Looking for a ride and all about. Looking for a ride and all about the way. Looking for a ride and all about. The lazy lines look pretty. We can get over to New York City. And listen to her daddy's song. Making love is wrong. But we were only hiding sitting in the back seat of my car.

(Singing) We were only hiding, sitting in the back seat of my car. Looking for a ride and all about. Looking for a ride and all about. Looking for a ride and all about. Looking for a ride and all about. When we finish driving, we can say we were late in arriving. But listen to her daddy's song. We believe that we can't be wrong. Oh, oh, we believe that we can't be wrong. Oh, oh, we believe that we can't be wrong. We can make it out of Jersey City, sitting in the back seat of my car.

(Singing) Looking for a ride and all about. Looking for a ride and all about. Looking for a ride and all about. Ooh-ooh-ooh, ooh, oh-oh, ooh-ooh-ooh, oh-oh.

(Singing) Oh, oh, we believe that we can't be wrong. Oh, oh, we believe that we can't be wrong. Oh, oh, we believe that we can't be wrong. Oh, oh we believe that we can't be wrong. Oh, oh, ah...

(Singing) Whoa, we believe that we can't be wrong. Oh, oh, we believe that we can't be wrong. Oh, oh, we believe that we can't be wrong. Oh, oh, we believe that we can't be wrong. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Oh, oh, we believe that we can't be wrong. Oh, oh, we believe that we can't be wrong. Oh, oh, we believe that we can't be wrong. Believe that we can't be wrong. We believe that we can't be wrong.

(APPLAUSE)

HARDING: Ted Leo. The awesome Ted Leo. Fantastic, Ted. We're going to get everyone back on the stage here now, please. Will you please welcome back to the stage everyone, and a little quiet now ladies and gentlemen please. Our CABINET is now ended.

These are actors, as I foretold you, were all spirits and are melted into air, thin air, like the baseless fabric of this Vivienne Westwood suit. The brilliant songs, the thought provoking readings, the slightly drunk comics, the great City Winery itself, yes, all which it inherits shall dissolve and like this insubstantial pageant faded, leave not a guitar pick behind. We are such stuff as dreams are made on, and our little life is rounded with a sleep. Ladies and gentlemen, The CABINET is closed. This is NPR.

(LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "SINGING A SONG IN THE MORNING")

HARDING: (Singing) Singing a song in the morning. Singing it again at night. I don't even know what I'm singing about but it makes me feel I feel all right, yeah, yeah. It makes me feel I feel all right. Singing a song in the morning. Singing it again at night. I don't even know what I'm singing about but it makes me feel I feel all right, yeah, yeah. It makes me feel I feel all right. Go Ted.

LEO: (Singing) Singing a song in the morning. Singing it again at night. I don't even know what I'm singing about but it makes me feel I feel all right, oh yeah. It makes me feel I'm feeling all right.

HARDING: Sean now.

NELSON: (Singing) Singing a song in the morning. Singing it again at night. I don't really know what I'm singing about but it makes me feel I feel all right. It makes me feel I feel all right.

HARDING: Here we go. (Singing) Ah, ah, ah, ah. Ah, ah, ah, ah.

(APPLAUSE)

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