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A Lone Trumpeter Serenades The National Mall

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A Lone Trumpeter Serenades The National Mall

A Lone Trumpeter Serenades The National Mall

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/155989687/156034876" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF TRUMPET MUSIC)

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

We're listening to the sounds of music al fresco this summer on WEEKEND EDITION and as the July 4th holiday approaches, we present a trumpeter whose been playing "The Star-Spangled Banner" just down the street from NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C.

(SOUNDBITE OF TRUMPET MUSIC, "THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER")

JOHN THORNTON: My name's John Thornton.

SIMON: It was a hot afternoon. John Thornton was just outside of the National Archives, seated on a plastic bucket, sweating under a Washington Nationals cap. Big buses rolled by, a few tourists dropped a little change in a bucket as John Thorton's trumpet blew melodies from the steamy sidewalks into the sky. Like this song of summer.

(SOUNDBITE OF TRUMPET MUSIC, "SUMMERTIME")

THORNTON: I played in front of the Empire State once. It was fun. You know, I like a crowd.

(SOUNDBITE OF TRUMPET MUSIC, "TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALLGAME")

THORNTON: It's like some people play chess, you know, checkers and chess. You know, it's a hobby, and they get real good at it. Same thing with an instrument, you just keep playing it. You keep doing it, man, you get good.

SIMON: John Thornton, busking for tourists and passersby on the corner of Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue in Washington, D.C.

(SOUNDBITE OF TRUMPET MUSIC)

SIMON: You're listening to WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News.

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