ALEX COHEN, host:

So Halloween is tomorrow night and if you don't have a costume yet, you'd better get one. If you're a gal, you've probably noticed that female costumes have become more and more risqué of late. Sexy maid costumes, sexy pirate costumes, sexy nurse costumes. Halloween's almost become an excuse for women to unleash their naughty nature.

Well, get ready, guys. Halloween costumes are now giving you too the opportunity to make yourself over. The latest trend in male costumes is muscly. Men and boys can now flaunt faux six-pack abs thanks to a new slew of uber macho costumes.

We're joined now by Casey Crawford. She's manager of the Halloween Club store in the Los Angeles suburb at Santa Fe Springs.

Thanks for joining us, Casey.

Ms. CASEY CRAWFORD (Manager, Halloween Club): Thanks for having me.

COHEN: So I want to ask you about this trend. This weekend there is a little trick-or-treat gathering in my neighborhood and I was just stunned at how many little boys I saw in these muscle suits.

Ms. CRAWFORD: Oh, god. The kids are loving it. Now every kid to come in, he wants the muscles. There's muscle Power Rangers. The pirates are even muscled. Every superhero has a muscle costume.

COHEN: Why do the kids want the muscles?

Ms. CRAWFORD: You know what, they just run around like the bodybuilders and they take their little hands and they cross them in front and they're going, muscles! And I don't think they have a clue why they want the muscles. It's just that that's something that everyone has, so they want it too. And anyway, the muscle costumes - they look better. They're nicer. I mean, they look more like a superhero, where the economy ones are just thin fabric and if the kid is slightly chubby or slightly too skinny, they're not going to look good. But with the muscles, you can have any size body and you'll like this little buff muscle person, so I think that's part of the reason why too.

COHEN: Wow. Is this sending kind of a weird body image message to kids who are overweight? Is this now the solution? Instead of better nutrition in our schools, we just give them some fake muscles?

Ms. CRAWFORD: I hope not.

(Soundbite of laughter)

COHEN: A lot of parents have been upset by all of the sexy costumes that have come out lately for girls. And you know, this really isn't the right message to send to them, that they should be, you know, kind of dressing up and primping.

Ms. CRAWFORD: Now, that I agree with.

COHEN: But you don't have a problem with saying to the boys, oh, this is what a good body looks like?

Ms. CRAWFORD: No, because only the superheroes have bodies like that. So if they want to be a superhero, they could have a body like that.

COHEN: Now is this just for kids or are you seeing any of this in the adult costumes as well?

Ms. CRAWFORD: Oh, my god. The adult costumes as well.

COHEN: Like what?

Ms. CRAWFORD: The adults are actually coming and asking if we have muscle T-shirts or muscle chest pieces. It actually gives them a little body. It makes them look like they have a six-pack, instead of like this big old gut.

COHEN: They might be wearing this a lot longer than Halloween, it would seem.

Ms. CRAWFORD: Mm-hmm. I wouldn't be surprise on some of them.

(Soundbite of laughter)

COHEN: And Casey, might I ask, what are you going to be dressing up best for Halloween this year?

Ms. CRAWFORD: You know what? I am so tired. Probably nothing. I'll probably - in my pajamas and go home.

COHEN: I think you just have to rework your costume concept. I think you just tell everyone you're dressing as an overworked Halloween store manager.

Ms. CRAWFORD: You know what? I should wear my pajamas. It's such a good idea. No...

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. CRAWFORD: And a robe and some - and I got on my little slippers on and say I'm an overworked Halloween manager.

(Soundbite of laughter)

COHEN: Casey Crawford is the manager of the Halloween Club store in Santa Fe Springs, California.

Thanks so much and Happy Halloween.

Ms. CRAWFORD: Oh, thank you. Happy Halloween to you.

(Soundbite of song, "Monster Mash")

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