NPR logo

Boxer Claressa Shields,17, Reaches Olympic Semifinal, Where A Medal Awaits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/158231167/158232601" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Boxer Claressa Shields,17, Reaches Olympic Semifinal, Where A Medal Awaits

London 2012: The Summer Olympics

Boxer Claressa Shields,17, Reaches Olympic Semifinal, Where A Medal Awaits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/158231167/158232601" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Yesterday was a historic day for boxing. For the first time ever, women competed for Olympic medals in the sport. And today in the ring, a boxer we featured on this program back in February, a high school student from Flint, Michigan.

CLARESSA SHIELDS: Well, we're going to start with - my name is Claressa Shields. I've been boxing since I was 11.

CORNISH: Independent producers, Joe Richman and Sue Jaye Johnson of Radio Diaries, followed Claressa as she prepared for and competed in the Olympic boxing trials.

SHIELDS: My record is 19 and 0. Yeah, undefeated.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Ladies and gentlemen, it is my pleasure to introduce...

SHIELDS: I have this dream, I'm in London and it's the finals in the Olympics. I can hear the announcer. I mean, they're going to say it like, and the first woman Olympian, at 165 pounds, is Claressa Shields.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Claressa Shields.

CORNISH: Well, today in London, Shields got one big step closer to that dream. She won her first bout and advanced to the semifinal round, the final four in the middleweight category. And that means she is guaranteed a medal because in boxing, the two losers in the semifinal round both receive bronze.

On Wednesday, if Claressa Shields wins, she'll go on to compete for the gold medal.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

CORNISH: You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.