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MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Today in Las Vegas, the Latin Grammys take the stage at the Mandalay Bay. This is the ceremony's 8th year, and there will be predictable big name stars are there - Ricky Martin, Gloria Estefan and others. But of all the categories, the one that caught our eye today was for best Latin Children's Album. Some of the artists are kind of cutesy. There's Acalanto.

(Soundbite of song "Vida De Bebe")

ACALANTO (Singer): (Singing in foreign language).

NORRIS: Strings for Kids.

(Soundbite of song "El Sueno Del Elefante")

NORRIS: Voz Veis.

(Soundbite of song "Como Se Llega A Belen")

VOZ VEIS (Reggaeton Group): (Singing in foreign language).

NORRIS: And then there's 8-year-old Miguelito.

(Soundbite of song "Mas Grande Que Tu")

MIGUELITO (Singer): (Singing in foreign language)

NORRIS: Miguelito is one of a handful of young musicians to bring the popular Spanish urban music of reggaeton to a younger audience. Reggaeton's lyrics can be raunchy, and some of the young reggaeton artists clean up their lyrics. But Miguelito takes a different path.

(Soundbite of song "Montala")

NORRIS: The video for his song "Montala" features the young rapper showing off his gold chain and a black bandana. In the background, a dozen women over the age of 18 furiously shake their hip.

(Soundbite of song "Montala")

MIGUELITO: (Singing in foreign language)

NORRIS: Miguelito's young star is rising. He was signed to reggaeton giant Daddy Yankee's label and toured with him this year. By the time he hits his teens, he and reggaeton could be considered old school.

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