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The Best James Bond: Who's No. 1 As 007?

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The Best James Bond: Who's No. 1 As 007?

The Best James Bond: Who's No. 1 As 007?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/161817395/162071554" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It is a big time for anniversaries. This week marks half a century of 007 on the silver screen.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "DR. NO")

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: (as character) Mister?

SEAN CONNERY: (as James Bond) Bond. James Bond.

INSKEEP: Aren't secret agents supposed to use a pseudonym?

Sean Connery made his debut as James Bond in "Dr. No," which premiered 50 years ago this Friday. And all this week on MORNING EDITION we're going to hear how Bond became a cultural icon. We'll also learn about his favorite drink.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE)

CONNERY: (as James Bond) A martini, shaken not stirred.

INSKEEP: And we'll ask about the science behind Bond's high-tech gadgets.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "DIE ANOTHER DAY")

JOHN CLEESE: (as Q) One pane unbreakable glass, one standard issue ring finger, twist so. Voila. Ultra-high-frequency single digit sonic agitating unit.

INSKEEP: The voice of John Cleese. And we'll hear from the man who created the Bond theme's signature guitar riff.

(SOUNDBITE OF JAMES BOND THEME MUSIC)

INSKEEP: You can also play the 007 game @NPR.org. You know, vote for who's your favorite among the many actors to play Bond. They range, of course, from Connery to Daniel Craig. You might even vote for Timothy Dalton. Bond Week on MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

Inskeep, Steve Inskeep.

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