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GUY RAZ, HOST:

From time to time on this program, we've been asking filmmakers about the movies that they could watch over and over again, including this one from a queen.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

QUEEN LATIFAH: My name is Queen Latifah, and I'm an actor. The movie I've seen a million times is "Steel Magnolias," directed by Herbert Ross, starring Sally Field and Julia Roberts.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "STEEL MAGNOLIAS")

JULIA ROBERTS: (as Shelby) Mama? Mama?

LATIFAH: The character that is played by Julia Roberts has diabetes, but yet she wants to get married, she wants to have kids, she wants to go through life as normal.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "STEEL MAGNOLIAS")

ROBERTS: (as Shelby) Mama, I don't know why you have to make everything so difficult. I look at having this baby as the opportunity of a lifetime. Sure, there may be risk involved. That's true for anybody.

LATIFAH: Sally Field's character worries about her a lot because she can't do everything. So she's kind of always worried about her daughter and the next adventures that she's going to go on.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "STEEL MAGNOLIAS")

SALLY FIELD: (as M'Lynn) Why did you deliberately do this to yourself?

ROBERTS: (as Shelby) Diabetics have healthy babies all the time.

FIELD: (as M'Lynn) You are special, Shelby. There are limits to what you can do.

LATIFAH: She gets really sick. And I don't know if I should give up the ending for people who may not have seen it, but it gets really, really difficult.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "STEEL MAGNOLIAS")

FIELD: (as M'Lynn) Open your eyes, Shelby. Open your eyes. Open your eyes. Look at him.

LATIFAH: But when they go through the difficult times is when all the ladies kind of come together and bond. And they all hold onto each other when times are tough.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "STEEL MAGNOLIAS")

DOLLY PARTON: (as Truvy) How you holding up, honey?

FIELD: (as M'Lynn) I'm fine.

OLYMPIA DUKAKIS: (as Clairee) It was a beautiful service.

LATIFAH: I think my favorite scene in the movie is with all the ladies in the cemetery. Sally Field's character, M'Lynn, just loses it. And she just seems so vulnerable and so angry.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "STEEL MAGNOLIAS")

FIELD: (as M'Lynn) I can jog all the way to Texas and back and my daughter can't. She never could. God, I'm so mad, I don't know what to do. I want to know why.

LATIFAH: But then, oddly enough, it turns into a completely humorous scene by the time it's done because, once again, the ladies rally around each other and come up with something really funny to bring them out of the depths of the darkness where they are.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "STEEL MAGNOLIAS")

FIELD: (as M'Lynn) I just want to hit somebody until they feel as bad as I do. I just want to hit something. I want to hit it hard.

LATIFAH: Clairee picks Ouiser and says: Hit her.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "STEEL MAGNOLIAS")

DUKAKIS: (as Clairee) Hit her. Hit this.

FIELD: (as M'Lynn) Are you high, Clairee?

PARTON: (as Truvy) Clairee, have you lost your mind?

DUKAKIS: We'll sell T-shirts saying, I slapped Ouiser Boudreaux.

(LAUGHTER)

SHIRLEY MACLAINE: (as Ouiser) You are a pig from hell.

LATIFAH: Because I was around 19 years old when it came out, I was sort of into those emotional types of movies. Little did I know it would break my heart.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RAZ: That's actress Queen Latifah talking about the movie that she could watch a million times, "Steel Magnolias." Latifah stars in a remake of that film with an all-African-American cast tonight on Lifetime.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RAZ: You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

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