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The Ukrainian feminist movement, Femen, best known for its topless protests, has opened its first international training camp in Paris.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports that the group has already attracted new recruits and new causes.

(SOUNDBITE OF FOOTSTEPS IN THE ROADWAY)

ELEANOR BEARDSLEY, BYLINE: On a sunny October morning, seven young women stride purposefully toward the stone facade of the French Justice Ministry. Suddenly they throw their coats to the ground. Their bare bosoms are painted with slogans, garlands decorate their hair.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHANTING PROTESTERS)

BEARDSLEY: Justice screws us, they yell in French as they unfurl a black banner that reads Rape Club. This is Femen. And today, the group is protesting the verdict of a recent gang rape trial where a few of the suspects got suspended sentences and the rest got off.

Inna Shevchenko is the Ukrainian leader of Femen.

INNA SHEVCHENKO: Now Paris is not the capital of love but the capital of rapists. Today we came here to demand to put in jail rapists, and we say that if Justice will not change their decision against group rapists of two 16-year-old girls, we're going to catch them and to castrate them.

(SOUNDBITE OF WOMEN CHANTING)

BEARDSLEY: Shevchenko calls France the center of feminism, which is why the group is opening its international headquarters here. But she says whether it's Paris or Kiev, women share a common cause, fighting against patriarchy and all of its manifestations - religion, the sex industry, dictatorship. The group is already famous in the East for protesting Russian President Vladimir Putin and Belarus's strongman Alexander Lukashenko.

Shevchenko fled her native Ukraine last August after sawing through an Orthodox cross with a chainsaw to support jailed feminist punk band Pussy Riot. Shevchenko has demonstrated for women's causes for years. But she says it was only when they began doing it topless that people paid attention.

SHEVCHENKO: In a protest like this, I see a great potential of women's nudity, using as a weapon. And I understand every time, more and more, that it works. That it is a peaceful way. But, you know, they are even ready to use violence against our peaceful, naked bodies.

BEARDSLEY: The protesters chant in English and French and constantly change positions. They lie on the sidewalk or circle the guards. A crowd of onlookers has begun to gather. Senegalese construction worker Bokom Sitigam has wandered over from a worksite next door.

BOKOM SITIGAM: (Speaking foreign language)

BEARDSLEY: Sitigam says he's astounded to see naked women doing this and they must be brave. I'm going to take pictures and post them on Facebook, he says. Why shouldn't I? The journalists are doing it. Sister Marie Veronique, a Dominican nun, happens by. She stops to pose for photos with some of the Femen protesters, their naked torsos a startling contrast to her black and white nun's habit. But the nun says she's not shocked.

MARIE VERONIQUE: (Through interpreter) If this demonstration is against gang rape, I think they're absolutely right to do this. It is a good way to shock people and call attention to this.

BEARDSLEY: Femen France is currently operating out of a donated workspace in a blue-collar Paris neighborhood. The training is physical as well as mental. Members must be ready to run, climb and confront police. Twenty-eight-year-old Julia, a fashion photographer, is one of the new French recruits.

JULIA: I followed Ukrainian Femen, so when I knew they were here in France, I just joined for sure.

BEARDSLEY: And you're not at all nervous?

JULIA: Never, never. I am more nervous taking the subway late to go home than doing this.

BEARDSLEY: The police arrive late, after Femen members have put back on their coats and are talking to reporters. But as one of the group's main goals is to provoke, they quickly shed their jackets and dash back in for a second round. Now they're going back for a confrontation with police. Here we go. This time, it's a heated battle as the police try to round up the women, not knowing quite how and where to grab them.

The gendarmes end up encircling the protesters with plexiglass shields. Eventually, Femen agrees to be escorted to the metro, with their clothes on. The group can claim a measure of success. Their demo was all over the nightly news, and the Paris prosecutor has appealed the rape verdict and called for a new trial. Eleanor Beardsley, NPR News, Paris.

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