Aid Agencies Respond to Devastation in Bangladesh Bangladesh is recovering from the biggest cyclone to hit the flood-prone country in years. Relief worker Vince Edwards tells of efforts to recover survivors and repair the damage caused by Cyclone Sidr.
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Aid Agencies Respond to Devastation in Bangladesh

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Aid Agencies Respond to Devastation in Bangladesh

Aid Agencies Respond to Devastation in Bangladesh

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ANDREA SEABROOK, Host:

We spoke earlier today with Vince Edwards, the Bangladesh national director for the relief group World Vision. He described the devastation.

M: The estimates are about 280,000 families that are being made homeless, primarily because of their houses being damaged either fully or partially. Our teams are also reporting that there has been extensive damage to the rice crops, and almost 70 percent of the rice crops have been devastated. And there's also a huge loss to livestock, which will have a major impact on the household livelihood.

SEABROOK: Geography and climate work against Bangladesh. The country is in the Ganges River delta. And while the land is fertile, it is low-lying. And the country lives through an annual cycle of monsoons and cyclones that can claim hundreds of thousands of lives. The climate is especially harsh on the poor. And this was apparent in the latest storm.

M: It's estimated that 40 to 50 percent of the houses that have collapsed are either made of mud or bamboo. And I'm sure these will not be able to stand the, you know, the winds of this speed. And that's why you see such a large devastation in the area, and several of these families that are being made homeless.

SEABROOK: We reached Vince Edwards of World Vision in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh.

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