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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

When we're kids, we love birthdays. And then we get older, and our special day becomes less and less thrilling. To some, birthdays become dreadful. And that's where commentator David Was found himself, when a major milestone arrived. But then he discovered a bright side.

DAVID WAS, BYLINE: Those who know me best, will attest to the fact that I've never met a freebie I wouldn't avail myself of. Whether it's a dish of mint chocolates in the bank teller line, or a swing of kombucha at Whole Foods market, I'm genetically wired to take what's offered - and probably return for seconds. I don't even have to be hungry, if the price is right - meaning, there is none.

I had an opportunity to indulge my weakness for handouts recently, when my 60th birthday rolled around. I was feeling all mopey and depressed, unable to sleep the night before, when my dear wife begged me to look at the bright side: Hey Grandpa, at least you get a free Grand Slam Breakfast at Denny's. My mood lifted instantly. I reached over to the nightstand, ignited the old iPad, and Googled up birthday freebies.

Eureka - 13.7 million results came back, in point-18 seconds. And I was off and running, at warp speed. Free entrees, free desserts, free skiing, free car washes, free miniature golf, bowling and movie popcorn. It was mine - all mine! - just for being born.

My driver's license hot in hand, we checked in at Denny's at 5 a.m., to start the caloric juggernaut before daybreak. Happy birthday, the waitress intoned with little detectable enthusiasm, when handing over the high-cholesterol birthday platter: pancakes, grits, eggs, hash browns - all for nothing. Well, I did leave a nice tip for the grumpy server.

For lunch, I had me a free chipotle cheesesteak sandwich, and a tasty beverage, at Jersey Mike's sub shop; and then topped it all off that evening with a beef brisket platter at Famous Dave's BBQ that perty near landed me in an ER. My bold experiment in cash-free, low-roughage eating had caused a near-riot in my digestive system.

Somehow, I reckon the universe is trying to wise me up to a maxim I've spent the better part of my adult life trying to disprove: There actually is no such thing as a free lunch. Everything comes with a time-delayed, karmic price tag. Consider me chastened. I've been living on unbuttered, whole-grain toast, and carbonated spring water, for the last few days. And yes, I had to pay for it with cold, hard cash. Now that, was tough to swallow.

BLOCK: Commentator and musician David Was looks for the occasional freebie in Los Angeles.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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