Copyright ©2012 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Again, from our journal, stories of things past, we bring you one from Bluffton, South Carolina, where acts of kindness multiplied at the Corner Perk Cafe. It all began when one the regulars decided to pay it forward.

JOSH COOKE: She comes in and says: Here's a $100. I just want to leave this for the next so and so people that come in and get drinks.

LYDEN: That's Josh Cooke, owner of the Corner Perk, talking to us in January. Since our story aired, Cooke says that he's received letters, postcards, visitors from the world over. He's done interviews with the Toronto Star, an Irish radio station.

COOKE: And a guy translated the story into Chinese and posted it on Chinese Yahoo on their news story page, which is wild.

LYDEN: Now, acts of kindness abound there. A nearby toll bridge has seen an increase in people paying for the car behind them, and Cooke estimates that about 100 people have come into the shop donating thousands of dollars for others.

COOKE: A lot of times it's like a chain reaction where somebody will start it and leave a five, a 10 or a 20.

LYDEN: He remembers one particularly frazzled woman who forgot her own money at home.

COOKE: We're like, actually, someone's paid for your drink already. She just kind of, like, broke down and was like, I really needed that today. That just gives me kind of the encouragement and strength to go on, which was just a blessing, you know?

LYDEN: That's a lot for a cup of joe. Josh Cooke, owner of the Corner Perk Cafe in Bluffton, South Carolina.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.