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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Several weeks ago, the fake news anchor Jon Stewart of "The Daily Show" warned his audience of an impending strike.

(Soundbite of "The Daily Show")

Mr. JON STEWART (Host): You may have noticed tonight that I was using a lot of words.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Mr. STEWART: It's because there may or may not be a writers strike next week, and so I was trying to get in as many words as I could...

(Soundbite of laughter)

Mr. STEWART: ...before something like that happens.

INSKEEP: Since the strike, fans have had to make due without Stewart's biting take on the news. But relief is on the way. Comedy Central says "The Daily Show" and its sister program, "The Colbert Report," will resume taping early next month.

It will put the two hosts to the test. Stewart and fellow news satirist Steven Colbert will have to improvise their monologues and interviews without the help of writers. In a statement, the two comedians said they would prefer to return to work with their writing staffs but, quote, "if we cannot, we would like to express our ambivalence. However, without our writers, we are unable to express something as nuanced as ambivalence."

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