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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

If you've ever paid attention to the music between the stories on our show, the track you're hearing now may sound familiar.

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CORNISH: This is the artist Bonobo. His compositions are a favorite of our directors and on heavy rotation here at ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

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CORNISH: Bonobo is the recording name of British composer and DJ Simon Green. He's a star of the electronic-music world, but says he wants to move past that boundary.

SIMON GREEN: The idea of electronic music for a lot of people is that it's synthetic and it's created digitally. I prefer to work with an actual source recordings of things that have travelled through an air into a microphone.

CORNISH: Simon Green's new album is called The North Borders, and he says it started with him in his attic studio, tinkling his thumb piano.

GREEN: I was just recording some kind of raw - it's just a raw recording of me playing on this calimba for awhile. And this is the first - the actual starting point of the whole album is this little clip of thumb piano.

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GREEN: The way I make music is often to kind of treat instrumentation like I would a sample. This track playing now, "Cirrus," this is actually the first piece that I did for the new album.

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GREEN: The main thing that I did with this was just to take the two notes of that thumb piano and then put them against this kick drum and make it into some kind of cohesive whole.

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GREEN: I'm just trying to sort of push the ideas of what can create melody, and what can create rhythm, and how drum sounds don't necessarily need to come from drums, that it can come from a different place.

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GREEN: The way I'm working now is I tend to treat all sounds, you know, I'm sampling from not just from records, but from outside. I have actually a microphone that I take out with me and (unintelligible) interesting sounds. You know, there's the noises from the truck, air brakes being used as a sort of melodic refrain somewhere on this record. I also recorded, you know, dropping coins into water, or in the subway, recording train doors opening. And it all eventually ends up in the music somewhere.

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GREEN: This is a recording of a vibraphone and a harp, which I found on a record. I'm often sort of - when I'm travelling, I'm kind of hitting the record stores as well, finding samples. And I found this particular sample in Boulder, Colorado. This is an example of one sort of snippet of a recording I found, which I thought had some really interesting textures. So I, you know, put it into a sample and played around with the tuning and did some processing to it and ended up becoming a part of a track called "Transits."

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GREEN: Again, it's about reconceptualizing the sounds and bringing it into a very different place from where it started.

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GREEN: There's a vocalist on this track, Geraldine(ph).

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GREEN: The album is called "The North Borders," and I like the imagery of borders and moving away from traditional or geographical fixings. And "The North Borders" has that sort of non-nationalistic sound to it.

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CORNISH: Simon Green records as Bonobo. You can hear full length songs from his new album at NPRMusic.org.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

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