Copyright ©2008 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Right now, many boomers are just trying to tackle the question of where to retire. Many are passing up Hilton Head or Florida in favor of the West.

Demographers are noting a flow of older people toward the Rocky Mountains. Places like Wyoming or Montana promise low crime, and fresh air, and low traffic.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And now you can add fresh powder to that list. A program in Aspen is called Bumps for Boomers. If you made it to a certain age without becoming an expert skier, this program is for you. It claims to teach baby boomers how to handle skiing on fresh powder. It also covers mogul skiing. Not sure…

(Soundbite of laughter)

MONTAGNE: …what that is but navigating steep slopes and hard bumps, I guess. Forget the beaches. Future Social Security recipients may spend their time swishing, swishing down Black Diamond Trails.

INSKEEP: That's what the mogul skiing is, is navigating the steep slopes and the hard bumps.

(Sound bit of song "My Generation")

Mr. ROGER DALTRY (Singer, The Who): (singing) People try to put us down. Just because we get around. Things they do look awful cold. Hope I die before I get old.

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