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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

We end All Tech with a musical performance you'd really want to hear live rather than stream, though you can find it online.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: (Unintelligible)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Yeah.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: (Unintelligible).

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #3: Yeah.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #2: Yeah, yeah, yeah.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Last Friday, some members of the Philadelphia Orchestra were stuck in a plane on the tarmac in Beijing, China, for three hours. Bad weather was to blame.

BLOCK: Luckily, though, for their fellow passengers, these musicians had their instruments on board.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #3: (Foreign language spoken). The Philadelphia Orchestra is on tour in China and on the way to Macao. And our musicians would like to offer you a musical surprise.

(APPLAUSE)

BLOCK: In-flight entertainment doesn't get much better than this.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC, "STRING QUARTER NO. 12 IN F")

BLOCK: An impromptu performance of the finale from Dvorak's "String Quartet No. 12 in F." The musicians were crowded into the middle of the plane, the cellist had her instrument in the middle of the aisle.

CORNISH: It might have been impromptu, but the five-minute performance had the hallmarks of formality, complete with page-turners holding sheet music. And, of course, there had to be an annoying phone call.

(SOUNDBITE OF RINGING)

BLOCK: Remember to silence those ringers. The Philadelphia Orchestra was the first American orchestra to play in Communist China back in 1973. This tour was to commemorate the 40th anniversary of that historic trip.

CORNISH: The Philadelphia Orchestra is flying back to the United States today. And, Melissa, is it so wrong to hope they run into another delay?

BLOCK: Well, maybe just one more time.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

(APPLAUSE)

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