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RACHEL MARTIN, host:

So we're not quite done with The Mountain Goats yet, as Alison alluded to, or even "Kidz Bopp," really. Producer Ian Chillag is here. Ian?

ALISON STEWART, host:

Illin(ph)?

IAN CHILLAG: Hello.

MARTIN: Is that what I called you? Illin?

CHILLAG: Yeah.

STEWART: That's what he wants to be called. But that's another segment.

MARTIN: It's a long day. Ian, is your name.

CHILLAG: There are a lot of people out there who know me as Illin. That's all I'm saying.

MARTIN: I was so intent on saying your last name right. Ian Chillag, you have a submission to our very popular series, Best Song in the World Today.

CHILLAG: Yeah, yeah. So a few years ago, I made my sister Hallie a mixtape. And I put this Mountain Goats song, "Dance Music" on it. And Hallie listened to it all the time.

Anyway, one night Hallie's daughter, who was then, I think, 5 years old, was sitting reading with her dad, Andrew. And they heard a noise in the back of the house. And Cora, her daughter, was like what if it's a robber? And Andrew the dad was like, what if it is a robber, Cora, what would you do? So Cora says, and I think this is a pretty cool - this is a quote, "I know what I'd do. I'd launch a glass across the room straight at his head and dash upstairs to take cover." Which is weird, right? It's like very specific.

MARTIN: Yeah. It sounds like a good idea, though.

CHILLAG: Well, yeah. At this point, I'd like to bring up a little bit of "Dance Music," and make sure and listen to the lyric here.

(Soundbite of song, "Dance Music")

Mr. JOHN DARNIELLE (Singer, Songwriter, The Mountain Goats): (Singing) I'm in the living room watching the Watergate hearings while my stepfather yells at my mother, launches a glass across the room straight at her head, and I dash upstairs to take cover.

CHILLAG: Clearly, Cora had been listening to her mom's mix, every song. And it was like New Pornographers was on there, Mates of State, I forget what else. And she memorized, honestly, all of it. There were songs about heroin - anyway.

(Soundbite of laughter)

CHILLAG: But she had like become the world's littlest indie rock fan, and "Dance Music" was her favorite. But that was two years ago.

So I called her up last night to see if she even remembered it. Can we bring "Dance Music" up again?

(Soundbite of song, "Dance Music")

Mr. DARNIELLE: (Singing) But then the special secret sickness…

Ms. CORA DUNLOP: (Singing) …starts to eat through you. What am I supposed to you? No way of knowing (unintelligible) find a few cul-de-sacs and buy them. There's only one place this road ever ends up, and I don't want to die alone. Let me down, let me down, let me down gently…

MARTIN: I'll let you down gently.

CHILLAG: Yeah, that was a 7-year-old singing I don't want to die alone, in case you couldn't make it out.

(Soundbite of laughter)

STEWART: And let me down gently, my goodness.

CHILLAG: So I asked Cora if she would write me a little thing about why she liked the song. That's all I said, why do you like the song? Here's what she came up with.

Ms. DUNLOP: It's good. It always sounds like da, da, da, in the background. I remember going to South Carolina listening to it. We had it turned up very loudly. That was before my sister was born. The whole family came when she had her birthday. I wish that people would do that for mine. No one does that for mine. Anyway, it's good. And that's all I have to say for today. Well, for now.

MARTIN: Oh, my gosh. That was the cutest thing.

(Soundbite of laughter)

CHILLAG: I know, I know. I mean, it's a little dusty in studio. I think I'm tearing up.

(Soundbite of laughter)

MARTIN: You don't go to her birthday parties, either.

CHILLAG: And not that it influenced her review in any or anything, but I think I should mention Saturday is Cora's birthday.

(Soundbite of laughter)

MARTIN: Oh, that makes a lot of sense.

CHILLAG: And she would like everyone to come visit her, if possible. Anyway, she asked. So because Cora's turning 8 soon and this is her favorite song, I would just like to say "Dance Music" is the Best Song in the World Today.

(Soundbite of "Dance Music")

Ms. DUNLOP: (Singing) All right, I'm on Johnson Avenue in San Luis Obispo, and I'm 5 years old or 6, maybe. And (unintelligible) she says there's something wrong with our new house, trip down the wire twice daily. And I'm in the living room watching the Watergate hearing while my stepfather yells at my mother…

CHILLAG: Can we just bring that down a sec? One more thing.

Ms. DUNLOP: I'm Cora Dunlop, and you're listening to BPP.

(Soundbite of laughter)

MARTIN: Nice, our new sign-off. That was just…

Ms. DUNLOP: (Singing) Dance music…

STEWART: Best Song in the World today, perhaps best singer in the world today.

MARTIN: Happy Birthday, Cora.

CHILLAG: Happy Birthday, Cora.

STEWART: Happy Birthday, Cora. Let's listen to a little more Mountain Goats. Producer Ian Chillag, thanks.

CHILLAG: Sure.

MARTIN: Thank you.

(Soundbite of "Dance Music")

Ms. DUNLOP: (Singing) But then the secret special sickness starts to eat through to you. What am I supposed to do? No way of knowing (unintelligible) find a few cul-de-sacs and buy them. There's only one place this road ever ends up, and I don't want to die alone. Let me down, let me down, let me down gently. Please come to get me. (unintelligible) music. Dance music.

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