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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Let's welcome our first two contestants: Whitney Adams and Sean Rupert.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Excited to have you both. You are both visitors to the Bell House in Brooklyn, New York. Whitney, you are visiting us from Bozeman, Montana.

WHITNEY ADAMS: Yeah.

EISENBERG: And Sean, from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

SEAN RUPPERT: That is correct.

EISENBERG: Fantastic. Are you guys fans of the television show "Game of Thrones"? Whitney?

ADAMS: I'm a fan of the books.

EISENBERG: Fan of the books, good.

ADAMS: I haven't watched all the seasons yet.

EISENBERG: Okay, you started with the literature and then you're holding off until the right time.

ADAMS: Yep.

EISENBERG: Okay. If you could be a character, do you have a choice of one that speaks to you?

ADAMS: Aria.

EISENBERG: Oh, very nice. Sean?

RUPPERT: I actually recently just watched the entire series on demand in like a weekend, so...

EISENBERG: Oh yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Because you had a lot of stuff going on. I get it.

RUPPERT: Yeah, yeah.

EISENBERG: And is there a character that you related to?

RUPPERT: No, I don't think so.

EISENBERG: Okay, good.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Because you live in reality. Interesting. All right, none of that will help, actually, because this game is actually called Game of Many Thrones. Jonathan, what are you going to make the contestants do?

JONATHAN COULTON: Well, so this is technically a game of thrones, but it's not really about "Game of Thrones." Fans of the book and TV series know that a king should never sit easy, which is why the throne in question is literally made of swords. Very uncomfortable.

But we think that a confident king is a comfortable king, so we're going to give you clues about all different kinds of much more comfortable chairs and ask you to identify them.

EISENBERG: It's a quiz about chairs.

COULTON: It's a quiz about chairs.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Okay.

COULTON: We could have also called it game of chairs.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: While jesters sweat under the spotlight, this is the seat from which King Steven Spielberg might shout "action."

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Sean?

RUPPERT: Director's chair.

COULTON: That's right. In the middle ages, it's where a king might have enjoyed a royal bloodletting. But today, it's where he might say "just a little off the top, Stu."

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Sean?

RUPPERT: Barber's chair.

COULTON: Barber's chair is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Yeah, you can clap. That's right.

COULTON: Yeah, he deserved it.

EISENBERG: He knows his bloodletting. Let him hear it.

COULTON: Perfect for the fickle king, this chair folds to make it easy to move around. However, as a famous idiom warns "you don't want to find yourself rearranging them on the Titanic."

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Sean?

RUPPERT: Deck chair.

COULTON: Deck chair, yes.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: While his chairless minions might sit on the ground, a king can relax above it in this outdoor chair that shares its name with a region of New York State.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Whitney?

ADAMS: Adirondack chair.

COULTON: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: A king can grab a seat on this versatile piece of furniture but he doesn't have to, since as Seinfeld once said, it's named for a whole empire based on putting your feet up.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Whitney?

ADAMS: Ottoman.

COULTON: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: These all sound like I'm trying to get you to buy a chair.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: There's plenty of space for a king to stretch in this chair, whose name literally means long chair in French.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Sean?

RUPPERT: Chaise lounge.

COULTON: Yes, or chaise long.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: These legless wonders are found in dorm rooms everywhere, but a king deserves the original, created by three Italian designers in 1968 and appropriately named the Sacko.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Sean?

RUPPERT: Beanbag chair.

COULTON: Beanbag chair, yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: I think a hard way to sell a chair would like "these legless wonders." Just like blech.

COULTON: Yeah, that's no good. I always preferred the butterfly chair to the beanbag chair.

EISENBERG: What is the butterfly chair?

COULTON: You don't know the butterfly chair?

EISENBERG: No, what is it?

COULTON: It's a metal thing that unfolds. It's kind of like a big butt hammock.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Why didn't they call it the butt hammock?

COULTON: They should have called it the butt hammock.

EISENBERG: I know they should have. That would have sold some butterflies.

COULTON: All right, here's your last question. This chair provides its sitter with a greater vantage point from which to throw Cheerios. Unfortunately, you have to be a very tiny king to sit in it.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Whitney?

ADAMS: High chair.

COULTON: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Art, how did they do on that game?

ART CHUNG: Well, it's time to crown a winner, and our winner is Sean.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Congratulations, Sean, you will be moving on to our Ask Me one More final round at the end of the show.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: How about a little song, Jonathan?

COULTON: How about a little song? This one is kind of about royalty.

(SOUNDBITE OF SINGING)

COULTON: Midnight, and I'm a waiting on the 12:05, hoping it'll take me just a little further down the line. Moonlight, you're just a heartache in disguise. Won't you keep my heart from breaking, if it's only for a very short time?

Playing with the Queen of Hearts, knowing it ain't really smart. The joker ain't the only fool who'll do anything for you. Playing out another lie; thinking about a life of crime. That's what I'll have to do to keep me away from you. That's what I have to do to keep me away from you, to keep me away from you.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Jonathan Coulton.

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