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Summer Songs: Banjo Adds Bang To Old Standard

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Summer Songs: Banjo Adds Bang To Old Standard

Music

Summer Songs: Banjo Adds Bang To Old Standard

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally today, if you caught any fireworks on the Fourth or saw them on your local news, you probably heard some favorite patriotic anthems. But did you ever wonder just what makes a song uniquely American? Just as our taste in food expands and changes, as our population grows and gets more diverse, so is our taste in music. And music lovers want to hear fresh ideas that reflect new realities and experiences, yet some songs remain quintessentially American, even as they inspire constant reinterpretation.

TELL ME MORE is teaming up with New Orleans member station WWNO's Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins to showcase some fresh takes on popular American songs. Today, Don Vappie of the Creole Jazz Serenaders plays the banjo and sings "Careless Love."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CARELESS LOVE")

MARTIN: That was Don Vappie of the Creole Jazz Serenaders on the banjo, singing "Careless Love." Our thanks to host Gwen Thompkins at WWNO's Music Inside Out for that recording. To hear more from Music Inside Out, go to NPR.org/tellmemore. And that's our program for today. I'm Michel Martin and you've been listening to TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Let's talk more tomorrow.

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