DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is...

(SOUNDBITE OF TWISTER COMMERCIAL)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Right foot, blue.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Right foot, blue.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Left-hand, red.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Left-hand, red.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Left.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Right.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Yellow.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Blue.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Green.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN AND WOMAN: (Singing) Yeah, Twister. You got to play Twister...

GREENE: Oh, those iconic - and also impossible instructions - came from Chuck Foley, the co-creator of Twister. He passed away last week at the age of 82.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The commercial we heard there is from the mid-1960s. Critics described Foley's game as quote, "sex in a box." But the inventor said the game is meant to break the ice by getting party guests out of their shoes and down onto the floor.

GREENE: Now Chuck Foley also made his mark with the invention of the hand launched helicopter and soft tipped darts. He told The New York Times that he was quote, "born with a gift. Ideas just popped into my head."

MONTAGNE: Chuck Foley proved to be invented at an early age. At 18, he made tri-colored taillights for his car - green, orange and red. It was such impressive handiwork, even the cop who pulled him over congratulated him on the idea.

GREENE: I wonder if he still got a ticket.

(LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TWIST AND SHOUT")

MONTAGNE: And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

GREENE: And I'm David Greene.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TWIST AND SHOUT")

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