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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Time now for a very special Found Recipes.

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CORNISH: The football edition.

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CORNISH: It's the first "Monday Night Football" of the NFL season, a season chock full of excitement and angst, fueled by chips and dip, sliders, nachos and, of course, chicken wings. Sunny Anderson of the Food Network is a fan of wings.

SUNNY ANDERSON: Wings are great because, you know, they're primal. First of all, you're eating with your fingers. You're gnawing meat off the bone, you know what I mean? And there's a good meat-to-skin ratio.

CORNISH: Ha. Meat-to-skin ratio. That's precisely what a carnivore needs when watching enormous men tumble and toss each other. You can go for spicy Buffalo wings or sweet and smoky barbeque wings. Or you try Sunny Anderson's wings, today's Found Recipe with a familiar tasting twist: peanut butter and jelly wings. OK, wait. Give it a chance.

ANDERSON: It sounds very comforting and sweet and calm, but you're going to tear into it like an animal because it's a wing, you know? At one point, I had a boyfriend, and like any boyfriend, the first thing I do is I give them the food quiz: What do you like? What don't you like? Sometimes it can be a deal breaker if they don't like certain things. I just can't imagine cooking without using pork.

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ANDERSON: But lucky for him, he liked pork and he loved peanut butter and jelly. And this is where the PB&J wings come from.

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ANDERSON: So I have a really cool process when I start off with an idea for a recipe. I make it, and then I take the first batch down to the corner where I live in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. And at the corner of my block is bar called Feeney's. They're very honest, probably because they have a couple of drinks in them.

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ANDERSON: I took three or four different batches of different wings to the bar. And before I knew it, everyone was raising their hands and saying, these are the wings, these right here. And when I told them they were peanut butter and jelly wings, you would have thought the bar - I mean, forget about it. That's what we say in Brooklyn. Forget about it. The bar went crazy.

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ANDERSON: You know, you can get those recipes for PB&J wings at npr.org. But what I want to do is concentrate on the sauce because that's what it's all about, all right? There's peanut butter in there that I mix in with a little bit of soy sauce. That's going to add some of that salt for you. Then the spice and the sweet comes from the Sriracha, which is kind of like a spicy ketchup. And then comes more sweet from grape jelly and coconut cream.

And then a little bit of water to kind of loosen it up so you can toss the wings in it. This is as simple as it gets. PB&J wings. These are already tried and true and tested on a bar full of men that are drunk. Ladies, follow me to the promise land.

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CORNISH: That's Sunny Anderson of the Food Network. Her debut cookbook is called "Sunny's Kitchen: Easy Food for Real Life." You can get the recipe for her PB&J wings on the Found Recipes page at npr.org.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is NPR News.

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