Simon Says

Simon SaysSimon Says

NPR's Scott Simon Shares His Take On Events Large And Small

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This week, at least 30 people died when a packed sailboat ran aground and capsized off the coast of the Bahamas, about 250 miles southeast of Miami. The people remaining on board clung onto that splintered boat for hours until the U.S. Coast Guard found them. The survivors are being cared for at the Coral Harbor Royal Bahamian military base until they're sent back to the place they risked their lives to leave.

They were Haitians fleeing their island for America. By the time they were found, they'd been at sea for eight or nine days and had run out of food and water. Many were severely dehydrated. Professional smugglers stuff people onto boats like so many sacks, with only the food and water they might be able to carry and no life jackets. That's according to U.S. Coast Guard Lieutenant Commander Gabe Somma. They are ruthless, the commander says. They don't care about safety, they only care about making money.

The number of Haitians caught by the Coast Guard crossing the Mona Passage between the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico has soared. More than 2,000 have died so far this year. Coast Guard Chief Petty Officer Ryan Doss told the Miami Herald: Every year we see hundreds of migrants needlessly lose their lives at sea. And those are just the ones officials are aware of. Commander Somma adds we don't know how many people die out there on the open water.

Marleine Bastien, the director of Haitian Women of Miami, told the Sun-Sentinel newspaper that increasingly harsh conditions in Haiti are causing more people to risk their lives to try to leave. Thousands of Haitians are still living in tents nearly four years after a crushing earthquake. The cholera outbreak continues to create havoc there, she says. It's still active, it's still killing people.

But how many earthquakes and typhoons, typhoid and cholera outbreaks have struck the world over the last four years? Haiti is no longer at the center of world attention, and thousands of Haitians choose to put their lives in the hands of criminals and dangerous waters to try to get to the United States. The hope of America is still a beacon that pulls people to our shores. Of course, it's illegal to enter the United States this way and try to work and stay. But in this week in which we give thanks for freedom and plenty, we might want to remind ourselves that some of the first Americans became American by risking their lives to sail across rough seas.

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SIMON: And you're listening to NPR News.

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Simon Says

Simon SaysSimon Says

NPR's Scott Simon Shares His Take On Events Large And Small