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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now another entry in our series Number of the Year, telling the biggest stories of 2013 through numbers. Today, it's 17. That's the number of big, super-expensive movies that came out during the past summer movie season, May to July. And by super-expensive, we mean they cost around $150 million or more. In some cases, a lot more. But as NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports, only about 10 of those 17 were solidly profitable.

ELIZABETH BLAIR, BYLINE: It's a little like cramming too much candy in your mouth.

(SOUNDBITE FROM FILM "THE SMURFS 2")

JOHN OLIVER: Sweet smurf in heaven, what have you eaten?

BLAIR: Hollywood loves summer, so that's when the studios cram a lot of their big commercial releases into that short window.

(SOUNDBITE OF CRASHING NOISE)

BLAIR: It wasn't exactly a train wreck, but 17 movies released in just three months was way too many.

JEFF BOCK: It seemed like every time you would refresh your browser, you know, there was a new film going down in flames at the box office.

BLAIR: Jeff Bock's browser is often fixed on Hollywood data. He's an analyst with Exhibitor Relations. He says just look at July of 2013. In one month, eight giant movies came out: "Lone Ranger"...

(SOUNDBITE FROM FILM "THE LONE RANGER")

JOHNNY DEPP: We will protect you.

BLAIR: "Despicable Me 2"

(SOUNDBITE FROM FILM "DESPICABLE ME 2")

BLAIR: "Pacific Rim"...

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM "PACIFIC RIM")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Your fighting skills...

BLAIR: "Turbo"...

(SOUNDBITE FROM FILM "TURBO")

PAUL GIAMETTI: Terrifying, terrifying blazing speed.

BLAIR: "Red 2"...

(SOUNDBITE FROM FILM "RED 2")

BLAIR: "R.I.P.D."...

(SOUNDBITE FROM FILM "R.I.P.D.")

BLAIR: "Wolverine"....

(SOUNDBITE FROM FILM "THE WOLVERINE")

HUGH JACKMAN: No.

BLAIR: And "Smurfs 2."

(SOUNDBITE FROM FILM "THE SMURFS 2")

BOCK: Theater owners can't hold these films much longer than three to four weeks, and that's where the problem lies. They don't sustain like 20 years ago when Indiana Jones would play all summer long.

(SOUNDBITE FROM FILM "RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK")

HARRISON FORD: (As Indiana Jones) Why'd it have to be snakes?

BLAIR: One thing Indiana Jones does have in common with today's blockbusters: It spawned more Indiana Jones. Year in and year out, the movies that do well at the box office are sequels. Think "Iron Man 3" and "Despicable Me 2."

(SOUNDBITE FROM FILM "DESPICABLE ME 2")

STEVE CARELL: (As Gru) OK, that's weird. Why are you here?

BLAIR: Why were there 17 big movies released this summer? Couldn't studios release some of them at another time? Or make fewer movies that cost upwards of $100 million? Not happening, says Doug Creutz, an analyst with Cowen and Company.

DOUG CREUTZ: Even if every studio sits down and says there's too many big summer movies, they want the other guys to be the ones to make fewer movies. They don't want to be the ones themselves to make fewer movies. Because if you make less movies, then you're essentially making it easy for everybody else because now they don't have to compete with you.

BLAIR: The blockbuster model, says Creutz, is still the best way for a studio to clean up.

CREUTZ: Probably the biggest misfire this summer was "The Lone Ranger," right? Disney lost $200 million on it. They still made a pretty good amount of money in their studio this year. Why? Because they made a lot of money on "Iron Man" and they made a lot of money on "Monsters University."

(SOUNDBITE FROM FILM "MONSTERS UNIVERSITY")

JOHN GOODMAN: (As Sully) The truth is, I've been riding your coattails since day one.

BLAIR: If you think this summer was bloated with blockbusters, just wait until 2015. There's an "Avengers" sequel, a "Jurassic" sequel, "Batman vs. Superman" and reboots of "Mad Max" and "Terminator." If destruction's not your thing, there's a "Finding Nemo" sequel and the "Minions" movie. Dreamworks hopes to beat the summer of 2015 crowd. They'll be releasing "The Penguins of Madagascar" in March. Elizabeth Blair, NPR News.

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