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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Bob Dole returned home to Bob Dole's home state this week. The former Republican senator and presidential nominee is traveling in Kansas.

Here's Kansas Public Radio's Stephen Koranda.

STEPHEN KORANDA, BYLINE: Bob Dole is not running for office, but the 90-year-old has a tour schedule that could tire a politician half his age. He's made 10 public appearances over three days, including a stop here at the University of Kansas.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Welcome back.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: Yeah, thanks for coming this morning.

KORANDA: Dole has touched on serious topics during the trip. When asked the most critical issues facing the nation in the next decade, he says controlling the budget will be near the top of the list and among the more difficult.

BOB DOLE: You know, I know when we had legislation when I was there that affected Kansas, it was pretty hard to vote for it if it was taking something away from Kansas.

KORANDA: There's still plenty of Dole's trademark wit sprinkled throughout his talks. At a facility bearing his name on the KU campus, he jokes about his time at KU before going off to serve in World War II.

DOLE: And so we had a lot of farewell parties, but we didn't attend many classes.

(LAUGHTER)

KORANDA: Aldean Banker, from Dole's hometown of Russell, says she liked his ability to get things done in Washington.

ALDEAN BANKER: He was very able to get people to work together. And I think we need that in government right now.

KORANDA: University of Kansas political science professor Burdett Loomis says while many may remember Dole for getting things done, he was a tough-minded partisan and pretty conservative for his time.

BURDETT LOOMIS: But in the end, he was working to make this a better place. At the end, he compromised. And in the end, he could see the other person's position.

KORANDA: Besides being a presidential candidate three times, Loomis says Dole's legacy may well be his work in the Senate helping pass key legislation, like the Social Security overhaul and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Dole will continue his Kansas tour next month with more than a dozen additional stops.

For NPR News, I'm Stephen Koranda in Lawrence, Kan.

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