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Don't Overlook The Unsung Umpire; Referees Can Be Pretty, Too
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Don't Overlook The Unsung Umpire; Referees Can Be Pretty, Too
Don't Overlook The Unsung Umpire; Referees Can Be Pretty, Too
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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is an exciting time in sports. I mean, then again - when isn't it? The conference finals are winding down in the NBA and the NHL. Major league baseball - the season's revving up, and the World Cup awaits. Commentator Frank Deford has been thinking about some unsung heroes.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVAL RECORDING)

FRANK DEFORD: Not so long ago, while enjoying a libation in a decorous saloon, the proprietor, who happened to hail from the fabled Windy City, suddenly jarred the genteel assembled by turning on the Cubs game. Now, just at that moment, a Cubbie was heading toward the plate when the throw came in, and the runner - spoiler alert - the runner, being a Cub, was tagged out. OK, it's radio, but visualize the tableau. The runner, the catcher, but also a third figure - the umpire. And see him now - feet spread well apart, solidly grounded, mask off in his left hand. And his right arm flies up, thumb to the heavens. You don't even have to hear the, (IMITATING UMPIRE) you're out. It made me think how sometimes, the action of an official is every bit as memorable - as stylish - as what a player does. The soccer referee, presenting - presenting a yellow or a red card. He flips it like a magician finishing a trick. Soccer officials always stand so upright then, don't they? Or the other extreme - a wrestling referee, flush down on the mat with the two competitors, as one tries to pin the other's shoulder. And then, in a flash, the ref slaps his hand down. No player ends any kind of game as decisively as a wrestling ref does - better than a walk-off. By contrast, my favorite action from a boxing referee is almost dainty.Those times when he gently touches both boxers simultaneously to break up a clinch. And then, subtly, he drifts away. It's always called backpedaling - where else but in a boxing ring does anybody backpedal? Football officials are the least distinctive because they just throw flags, and then let the head ref explain later. I do like the symmetry, though, when two officials, side-by-side under the goalpost, throw up their hands in unison to signal a successful field goal. Who would ever think that football could remind you of synchronized swimming? Basketball officials are the most expressive, though. The hand-slapping, the hips business - (IMITATING OFFICIAL) blocking. Or the scraping motion across the top of the ball, to indicate that the defender didn't touch his man, only the ball.Beautiful stuff. Better than most dunks that mere players do. The most expressive ref I ever saw was an NBA Hall of Famer named Mendy Rudolph. When it was time out, he'd take his stance, put the ball in the crook of his left arm and with his right hand, Mendy'd wipe his brow. And whether there was sweat there or not, he'd flip the drops away with distain. Oh, you had to see it. Referees always say, it's best not to be noticed. But the fact is that an official who makes his call with vigor and élan is really a beautiful part of the game. OK, let's watch that Cubs game again. The runner, the throw, the tag. Put the arm up, the thumb high - (IMITATING UMPIRE) you're out. And you're terrific.

GREENE: Making the call for us each Wednesday, Commentator Frank Deford. This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Green.

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