OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

From NPR in WNYC live from the Bell House in Brooklyn, New York, this is ASK ME ANOTHER. I'm Ophira Eisenberg, your host for this next hour of puzzles, word games, and trivia.

And we know that you love radio. But what kind of television watcher are you? Do you binge watch? Hate watch? Do you even own a television?

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Our VIP has spent more time in front of the television than anyone. And you know what, her eyes are just fine. It's New Yorker, TV critic Emily Nussbaum.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: And now, let's give it up for the man who is even better in reruns, our one-man house band, Mr. Jonathan Coulton.

JONATHAN COULTON, BYLINE: Hello, everybody.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: So our first game is called "This Means Wiki-War." Please welcome to the stage our contestants, Amelia Gollini (ph) and Monica Taylor (ph).

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: So as you both may know, one of the great things about Wikipedia is that anyone can edit a Wikipedia page. Which is also one of the most horrible things about Wikipedia, right, that anyone can edit it. So you're both big readers, as I understand. Monica I love Excel spreadsheets. I love them. I love people that make them. I like making them. But I know that you have made one of the most impressive ones - all the books that you've read over how many years?

MONICA TAYLOR: I started in 1991.

EISENBERG: The gasp. There was a gasp.

(LAUGHTER)

TAYLOR: No, but I always read a lot. And people wanted, you know, recommendations. So I started writing them down and I bold the ones I like. So I have tabs all through the years.

EISENBERG: And how many do you read a year, roughly?

TAYLOR: When my kids were young, I read maybe 15, and I was working full-time. But now I read about 40 or 50.

EISENBERG: 40 or 50 a year?

TAYLOR: Yeah.

EISENBERG: Oh, so what's the problem?

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Why aren't we at a hundred? No, that's amazing. Amelia, you just started a book club?

AMELIA GOLLINI: Yes I did.

EISENBERG: Speaking of books, what is the theme?

GOLLINI: We don't really have a theme. We actually take turns choosing the book and who gets to host. So we've had some hits and some misses. Somebody picked a romance novel. That was really awkward to talk about.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Why? How romantic was it?

(LAUGHTER)

GOLLINI: It was - well, it wasn't, like - it was a little bodice-rippery and just not well-written.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: (Laughing) OK.

GOLLINI: And I don't want to shame who picked it...

EISENBERG: Sure. Sure.

GOLLINI: ...But it was not me.

EISENBERG: OK.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: So in this game, we're going to quiz you about the subjects of long-running wiki-wars in which the proponents for each side of the issue constantly edit the article to fit their opinion. So I'll give you the clues to the subjects of various Wikipedia edit wars, and you tell me what is being fought over. So for an example, let's go to our puzzle guru, John Chaneski. John?

JOHN CHANESKI: If we said, after listening to this band's hit song "Hotel California" for the thousandth time, we still can't figure out if the band has the word the in its name. The band we're looking for is Eagles. And for the record, no, it does not have a the, it's just Eagles.

EISENBERG: Ring in and the winner will move on to our Ask Me One More final round at the end of the show. Here we go. Depending on who you ask, this tasty dish made with romaine lettuce, croutons, and parmesan cheese was named after a Roman emperor or a Los Angeles restaurant owner. What's the dish?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Monica.

TAYLOR: Caesar salad.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: And the best sources say, of course, that the recipe was created by...

TAYLOR: Julius Caesar.

EISENBERG: Julius Caesar. No, that is wrong.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Rome wasn't incorrectly credited in one day.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: It was the LA restaurateur Caesar Cardini.

COULTON: And who was he named after?

EISENBERG: That is a good point.

COULTON: Right?

EISENBERG: Yeah.

COULTON: Somebody dial up Wikipedia.

EISENBERG: That's right. Right. If we go way back, if we keep following this all the way back...

COULTON: I feel like I'm going to join these edit wars when we're done.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Editors have debated whether or not it's appropriate to feature a picture of a gigantic tarantula on the Wikipedia page for what phobia?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Amelia.

GOLLINI: Arachnophobia.

EISENBERG: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: This piece of information keeps getting added and deleted. A certain U.S. president shares his birthday, February 12th, 1809, with Charles Darwin. Which president is the subject of this a worthless piece of trivia?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Monica.

TAYLOR: Lincoln.

EISENBERG: Lincoln is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Since this name is shared by a U.S. state and a country that spans Europe and Asia, a long-running edit war is over which article should be considered the primary topic and thus show up first in search results?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Monica.

TAYLOR: Georgia.

EISENBERG: Georgia. Correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Should this band fronted by Fred Durst be labeled in Wikipedia as nu metal/rapcore band or rather as a rapcore/nu metal band?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(LAUGHTER)

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Monica.

TAYLOR: I don't know.

(LAUGHTER)

GOLLINI: I do. Limp Bizkit.

EISENBERG: I'm sorry, the answer is, who cares?

(LAUGHTER)

GOLLINI: Fair point. Fair point.

EISENBERG: But you are completely right. Limp Bizkit is correct.

GOLLINI: Thank you.

EISENBERG: This Florida city, the southernmost city in the continental U.S., briefly declared succession in 1982 to form the so-called Conch Republic. The edit war was over whether the Conch Republic be listed as an independent country. What is the name of the city?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Amelia.

GOLLINI: Oh, I didn't think my buzzer would work. Um...

(LAUGHTER)

GOLLINI: Uh.

EISENBERG: Is that what it comes down to now, that people are just like...

GOLLINI: The Keys?

EISENBERG: ...I don't even know if this works?

GOLLINI: The Florida Keys.

COULTON: Yes, very good.

EISENBERG: We're taking it?

COULTON: Correct answer.

EISENBERG: Correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: This is your last question. A certain late-night television host attempted to get on South Carolina's presidential ballot in 2008. An edit war ensued over whether he was a legitimate presidential candidate. Who was he?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Amelia.

GOLLINI: Stephen Colbert.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Puzzle guru John Chaneski, how did our contestants do?

CHANESKI: Well, Ophira, if you look up winner on Wikipedia, you'll be redirected to the page for Amelia. Congratulations.

(APPLAUSE)

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