LIANE HANSEN, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm Liane Hansen.

And joining us is puzzle master Will Shortz. Hi, Will.

Mr. WILL SHORTZ (Puzzle Editor, New York Times): Hi, Liane.

HANSEN: You're on the phone because you're in Park City, Utah, huh?

Mr. SHORTZ: That's right.

HANSEN: For?

Mr. SHORTZ: For the world premiere of 'Wordplay', this new documentary on the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament and me and crossword people.

HANSEN: Ah. Are you a big star out there in the mountains there?

Mr. SHORTZ: Well, no I don't think anyone knows me yet, but we'll see.

HANSEN: Oh, they will. Once the movie comes out they'll know the face behind all of those diabolical puzzles and puzzle books you've done, and crosswords over the years you know. Then you're in trouble.

Mr. SHORTZ: Well ...

HANSEN: Listen to you, you're whining.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Mr. SHORTZ: One of the great things about radio is that no one knows what I look like.

HANSEN: Yeah, it is, that is great -- the anonymity.

Well, you're actually out in Park City at the Sundance Festival, with our old friend Merle Regal(ph)...

Mr. SHORTZ: Right.

HANSEN: ... who is an amazing puzzle person. And he was actually the author of the challenge that you left everyone to work on last week. So remind us what it was.

Mr. SHORTZ: Yes. I said take the word carburetor, add two letters and re-arrange the result to name another car part, also in one word. What car part is it?

HANSEN: What car part is it?

Mr. SHORTZ: Well, add the letters H and G and you scramble to make turbocharger.

HANSEN: Oh. We had over a thousand entries from people who tried to solve this puzzle and our winner randomly selected from the correct answers is Dr. Jeffrey Lee from Newport Beach, California. Hi, can I call you Jeff?

Doctor JEFFREY LEE (Caller and Puzzle Contestant from Newport Beach, California): You sure may.

HANSEN: Tell us what you do in Newport Beach.

Dr. LEE: Well, in Newport Beach I mostly keep my books and clothes. I spend most of my time in L.A., where I work.

HANSEN: What do you do?

Dr. LEE: I'm a physician.

HANSEN: Oh, really.

Dr. LEE: Yes.

HANSEN: One of the few people that works in an industry other than movies, huh?

Dr. LEE: That's correct.

HANSEN: All right. And are you a puzzle player?

Dr. LEE: I am a big puzzle player.

HANSEN: Oh, you are?

Dr. LEE: Mostly crosswords and then the Word Play on the Sunday morning show.

HANSEN: Oh, what fun! Well, how long have you been playing on ...

Dr. LEE: Years for the Sunday morning show, but not very many submissions 'cause I usually don't get them.

HANSEN: (Laughing) well, you got this one.

Dr. LEE: Yeah.

HANSNE: And you know what that means?

Dr. LEE: I guess so.

HANSEN: Jeff meet Will, Will meet Jeff.

Dr. LEE: Hi, Will.

Mr. SHORTZ: Hi, Jeff.

Dr. LEE: Enjoy the Sundance.

Mr. SHORTZ: Yeah.

Well, Sundance is a compound word in which the respective parts begin with the letters S, D. Each of the answers today similarly is another compound word with these initials.

And here's clue number one. Beauty is said to be only this.

Dr. LEE: Skindeep.

Mr. SHORTZ: That's right.

Number two. Particles of wood around a tree-trunk.

Dr. LEE: Sawdust.

Mr. SHORTZ: Excellent.

Number three. It helps herd wooly farm animals.

Dr. LEE: Sheepdog.

Mr. SHORTZ: Excellent.

To Jump out of a plane with a parachute.

Dr. LEE: Skydives?

Mr. SHORTZ: Excellent.

At an unspecified future time.

Dr. LEE: Someday

Mr. SHORTZ: Uh-huh.

Final cycle of a washer.

Dr. LEE: Spindry?

Mr. SHORTZ: Excellent.

Ultimate confrontation.

Dr. LEE: Umm, ultimate confrontation?

Mr. SHORTZ: Yeah, singular -- So, two people are having a longstanding fight and they finally have a ...

Dr. LEE: Some kind of duel. But..

HANSEN: Is it showdown?

Mr. SHORTZ: Yeah, showdown, good.

Dr. LEE: Thank you.

Mr. SHORTZ: Hasty and careless.

Dr. LEE: Snap decision.

Mr. SHORTZ: No. And it has to be a compound word, not a two-word phrase.

Dr. LEE: Okay.

Mr. SHORTZ: Hasty and careless.

HANSEN: Speed demon?

Mr. SHORTZ: No.

Dr. LEE: I like it. I need help.

HANSEN: Yeah, I'm trying. He didn't accept my answer.

Mr. SHORTZ: If someone is fresh with you, what do you do to them across the face?

Dr. LEE: Slap.

Mr. SHORTZ: Yeah.

Dr. LEE: Slapdash.

Mr. SHORTZ: Slapdash it is.

What wind may create after a winter storm.

Dr. LEE: Snowdrift.

Mr. SHORTZ: Good. ]

Popular bread from San Francisco.

Dr. LEE: Sourdough.

Mr. SHORTZ: Uh-huh.

Time mentioned at the beginning of Captain Kirk's log.

Dr. LEE: Stardate.

Mr. SHORTZ: Uh-huh.

Plant with a long, showy bloom.

Dr. LEE: A long showy bloom. Not a flower person.

Mr. SHORTZ: And a second part...

Dr. LEE: Snapdragon?

Mr. SHORTZ: A snapdragon, excellent.

Tool that's also the name of a drink.

Dr. LEE: Screwdriver.

Mr. SHORTZ: Uh-huh.

Bus with only one level.

Dr. LEE: Singledeck?

Mr. SHORTZ: Singledecker is right.

A large dance party.

Dr. LEE: Slam dance?

Mr. SHORTZ: No. And it was also the name of a 1960's TV Show that competed with 'Hullabaloo'.

Dr. LEE: I probably didn't watch it. So ...

HANSEN: 'Cause you're probably -- I'm old enough to remember this one, 'Shindig'.

Mr. SHORTZ: Shindig, good job.

And here's your last one. When this program is heard every week.

Dr. LEE: This program is heard every week ...

HANSEN: On what day of the week is this program heard, Jeff?

Dr. LEE: Well, it's Sunday.

Mr. SHORTZ: Sunday, yes.

HANSEN: (Laughing) Sunday!

Dr. LEE: Oh!

Mr. SHORTZ: Nice work.

HANSEN: (Laughing) So simple. No, you got it, you were terrific, man you were so quick!

HANSEN: (Laughing)

Dr. LEE: All right.

HANSEN: No, you got it. You were terrific. Man, you are so quick. For playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, the Eleventh Edition of Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary and ThesaurusS, the Scrabble Deluxe Edition from Parker Brothers, the Puzzle Master Presents from Random House, Volume Two, and a set of Sudoku puzzle books presented by Will Shortz...

Dr. LEE: That's great.

HANSEN: ...from St. Martin's Press. Yeah, you're going to have all of your puzzle needs taken care of. Tell us your member station, what member station?

Dr. LEE: KCRW in Santa Monica.

HANSEN: Okay, Dr. Jeffrey Lee from Newport Beach, California. Hey, you were great.

Dr. LEE: Enjoy the Sundance, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you.

HANSEN: Thank you.

Dr. LEE: All right, bye-bye.

HANSEN: Oh, wow. All right, Will. Give us something to work on for the next week.

SHORTZ: Well, this week's challenge comes from listener Andrew Chaikin of San Francisco. Take the nine letters from G to O, change one of them to the following letter of the alphabet, and re-arrange the result to name a famous person.

And I'll give you two hints: the answer is this person's full name, and it's a person who's been in the news lately.

So again, the nine letters from G to O, change one of them to the following letter of the alphabet, re-arrange the result to name a famous person. It's the person's full name, and it's someone who's been in the news lately. Who is it?

HANSEN: When you have the answer, remember there's a new way to send in your entry. We no longer accept email entries, but what you do is you go to our Web site, NPR.org, and click on the 'Submit Your Answer' link on the Sunday puzzle page. Only one entry per person, please. Our deadline this week is Thursday, 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time. Please include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. We'll call you if you're the winner and you'll get to play puzzle on the air with the puzzle editor of the New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Will Shortz, who joins us this week from the Sundance Film Festival.

Hey, Will, have a great time.

SHORTZ: Thanks a lot, Liane.

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